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Year 11 English Language Paper 1 - Section A Question 1 - Identify List 4 things from the extract. That means four! Make sure these are within the lines that have been requested. You can quote or paraphrase
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Year 11 English Language Paper 1 - Section A Question 1 - Identify List 4 things from the extract. That means four! Make sure these are within the lines that have been requested. You can quote or paraphrase (put into your own words). Question 2 - Language Here you are analysing language from a specific point in the extract (which again the question will tell you). Make sure you are clear what the question is asking and what is the effect you are referring to. For example, how is the language used to describe the effects of the weather? Consider verbs, adjectives, similes, metaphors, personification, sentence types (short, complex, compound), onomatopoeia, caesura etc. Remember that you MUST refer the language devices and word types being used first, then embed a quotation and continue with analysis. Try and embed significant key words throughout for extra support regarding analysis. Question 3 - Identify Here you must consider the whole source. Again make sure you are clear what the question is asking you. As you read, divide the extract / source into key sections / sub-headings - this will help you understand how the writer has structured the extract. Comment on this first, explaining what is physically being described stage by stage. Next refer to the reference of characters if necessary but don t go into the analysis of them. Finally, is there a consistent theme? What runs throughout the entire extract? (Consider what the previous questions have been about). Remember to consistently embed quotations to support your analysis! Question 4 - Character Once again, make sure that you read the question and which part of the extract you need to refer to. Consider your own opinions, the writer s intentions, include quotations and extend analysis. Use PEAK here to read between the lines and offer a range of viewpoints and ideas - consider the atmosphere that is being created and how the characters respond to this. What do we learn about them? How do they develop? How does this impact the extract? What is the effect on the reader? A High Wind in Jamaica By Richard Hughes It was the custom that, whenever Mr. Thornton had been to St. Anne's, John and Emily should run out to meet him, and ride back with him, one perched on each of his stirrups. That Sunday evening they ran out as soon as they saw him coming, in spite of the thunderstorm that by now was clattering over their very heads, with 5 the lightning bounding from tree to tree, bouncing about the ground, while the thunder seemed to proceed from violent explosions in your own very core. Go back! Go back, you damned little fools! Mr Thornton yelled furiously: Get into the house! They stopped, aghast: and began to realise that after all it was a storm of more 10 than ordinary violence. They discovered that they were drenched to the skin must have been the moment they left the house. The lightning kept up a continuous blaze: it was playing about their father's stirrup-irons; and all of a sudden they realized that he was afraid. They fled to the house, shocked to the heart: and he was in the house almost as soon as they were. 15 Mrs. Thornton rushed out, saying that she thought the worst was over now. Perhaps it was; but all through supper the lightning shone almost without flickering. And John and Emily could hardly eat: the memory of that momentary look on their father's face haunted them. It was an unpleasant meal altogether. he lightning kept up its play. The thunder made talking arduous, but no one was 20 anyhow in a mood to chatter. Only thunder was heard, and the hammering of the rain. But suddenly, close under the window, there burst out the most appalling inhuman shriek of terror. Tabby! cried John, and they all rushed to the window. 25 But Tabby had already flashed into the house: and behind him was a whole club of wild cats in hot pursuit. John momentarily opened the dining-room door and puss slipped in, disheveled and panting. Not even then did the brutes desist: What insane fury led these jungle creatures to pursue him into the very house is unimaginable; but there they were, in the passage, caterwauling in concert: and 30 as if at their incantation the thunder awoke anew, and the lightning nullified the meagre table lamp.it was such a din as you could not speak through. Tabby, his fur on end, pranced up and down the room, his eyes blazing, talking and sometimes exclaiming in a tone of voice the children had never heard him use before and which made their blood run cold. He had gone utterly manic: and in the passage 35 Hell's pandemonium reigned terrifically. Outside, above the door the fanlight was long since broken. Something black and yelling flashed through the fanlight, landing clean in the middle of the supper table, scattering the forks and spoons and upsetting the lamp. And another and another - but already Tabby was through the window and streaking again for the 40 bush. The whole dozen of those wild cats leapt one after the other clean through the fanlight onto the supper table, and away from there only too hot in his tracks: in a moment the whole devil-hunt and its hopeless quarry had vanished into the night. Read again the first part of the source, lines 1 to 9. List four things from this part of the text about the weather. A B C D [4 marks] Q2 [AO2 - language] Look in detail at this extract from lines 10 to 22 of the source: They stopped, aghast: and began to realize that after all it was a storm of more 10 than ordinary violence. They discovered that they were drenched to the skin must have been the moment they left the house. The lightning kept up a continuous blaze: it was playing about their father's stirrup-irons; and all of a sudden they realized that he was afraid. They fled to the house, shocked to the heart: and he was in the house almost as soon as they were. 15 Mrs. Thornton rushed out, saying that she thought the worst was over now. Perhaps it was; but all through supper the lightning shone almost without flickering. And John and Emily could hardly eat: the memory of that momentary look on their father's face haunted them. It was an unpleasant meal altogether. he lightning kept up its play. The thunder made talking arduous, but no one was 20 anyhow in a mood to chatter. Only thunder was heard, and the hammering of the rain. How does the writer use language here to describe the ferocity of the weather? You could include the writer s choice of: words and phrases language features and techniques sentence forms. Q3 You now need to think about the whole of the source. This text is from the opening of a novel. How has the writer structured the text to interest you as a reader? You could write about: what the writer focuses your attention on at the beginning how and why the writer changes this focus as the extract develops any other structural features that interest you. Q4 [AO4 - evaluate with reference] Focus this part of your answer on the second half of the source, from line 23 to the end. A student, having read this section of the text said: The writer skilfully conveys Tabby s fear and the determination of the wild cats in pursuit of him. It is as if you are actually there. To what extent do you agree? In your response, you should: write about your own impressions of the scene evaluate how the writer has created these impressions support your opinions with quotations from the text. [20 marks] On a farm run by animals, the pigs are the ruthless leaders. Boxer is an old work horse who has collapsed through old age and exhaustion. The pigs have said that they will arrange to have Boxer taken to a human hospital to recuperate and the other animals believe this. However, when the van arrives to take Boxer away, Benjamin, a donkey and the only animal that can read, sees the writing on the cart s side and announces to Clover (a horse) and the other animals that the pigs are actually sending Boxer to be slaughtered and turned into glue at the knacker s yard. If he made a good recovery, Boxer might expect to live another three years, and he looked forward to the peaceful days that he would spend in the corner of the big pasture 1. It would be the first time that he had had leisure to study and improve his mind. He intended, he said, to devote the rest of his life to learning the remaining twenty-two letters of the alphabet. 5 However, Benjamin and Clover could only be with Boxer after working hours, and it was in the middle of the day when the van came to take him away. The animals were all at work weeding turnips under the supervision of a pig, when they were astonished to see Benjamin come galloping from the direction of the farm buildings, braying 2 at the top of his voice. It was the first time that they 10 had ever seen Benjamin excited--indeed, it was the first time that anyone had ever seen him gallop. Quick, quick! he shouted. Come at once! They're taking Boxer away! Without waiting for orders from the pigs, the animals broke off work and raced back to the farm buildings. Sure enough, there in the yard was a large closed van, drawn by two horses, with lettering on its side and a sly-looking man 15 in a low-crowned bowler hat sitting on the driver's seat. And Boxer's stall 3 was empty. The animals crowded round the van. Good-bye, Boxer! they chorused, good-bye! Fools! Fools! shouted Benjamin, prancing round them and stamping the earth with his small hoofs. Fools! Do you not see what is written on the side of that van? 20 That gave the animals pause, and there was a hush. Muriel began to spell out the words. But Benjamin pushed her aside and in the midst of a deadly silence he read: 'Alfred Simmonds, Horse Slaughterer and Glue Boiler, Willingdon. Dealer in Hides and Bone-Meal. Kennels Supplied.' Do you not understand what that means? They are taking Boxer to the knacker's! 4 25 A cry of horror burst from all the animals. At this moment the man on the box whipped up his horses and the van moved out of the yard at a smart trot. All the animals followed, crying out at the tops of their voices. Clover forced her way to the front. The van began to gather speed. Clover tried to stir her stout limbs to a gallop, and achieved a canter. Boxer! she cried. Boxer! Boxer! Boxer! And just 30 at this moment, as though he had heard the uproar outside, Boxer's face, with the white stripe down his nose, appeared at the small window at the back of the van. `Boxer!' cried Clover in a terrible voice. `Boxer! Get out! Get out quickly! They're taking you to your death!' All the animals took up the cry of `Get out, Boxer, get out!' But the van was 35 already gathering speed and drawing away from them. It was uncertain whether Boxer had understood what Clover had said. But a moment later his face disappeared from the window and there was the sound of a tremendous drumming of hoofs 5 inside the van. He was trying to kick his way out. The time had been when a few kicks from Boxer's hoofs would have smashed the van 40 to matchwood. But alas! his strength had left him; and in a few moments the sound of drumming hoofs grew fainter and died away. In desperation the animals began appealing to the two horses which drew the van to stop. `Comrades 6, comrades!' they shouted. `Don't take your own brother to his death!' But the stupid brutes, too ignorant to realise what was happening, merely set back their 45 ears and quickened their pace. Boxer's face did not reappear at the window. Too late, someone thought of racing ahead and shutting the five-barred gate; but in another moment the van was through it and rapidly disappearing down the road. Boxer was never seen again. Glossary: 1. pasture - field 2 braying the cries made by donkeys 3 stall animal bed 4 Knacker s knacker s yard: a place where animals are killed then their bodies are made into glue. 5 drumming of hoofs hoofs are horse s feet, drumming means to bang and kick one s feet wildly. 6 comrades friends You are advised to spend about 45 minutes on this section. Q1. [AO1] Read again the first part of the source, lines 1 to 5. List four things from this part of the text about Boxer. [4 marks] Q2. [AO2] Look in detail at this extract from lines 6 to 16 of the source: However, Benjamin and Clover could only be with Boxer after working hours, and it was in the middle of the day when the van came to take him away. The animals were all at work weeding turnips under the supervision of a pig, when they were astonished to see Benjamin come galloping from the direction of the farm buildings, braying 2 at the top of his voice. It was the first time that they 10 had ever seen Benjamin excited--indeed, it was the first time that anyone had ever seen him gallop. Quick, quick! he shouted. Come at once! They're taking Boxer away! Without waiting for orders from the pigs, the animals broke off work and raced back to the farm buildings. Sure enough, there in the yard was a large closed van, drawn by two horses, with lettering on its side and a sly-looking man 15 in a low-crowned bowler hat sitting on the driver's seat. And Boxer's stall was empty How does the writer use language here to show us what Benjamin felt about Boxer being taken away? You could include the writer s choice of: words and phrases language features and techniques sentence forms. Q3. [AO2] You now need to think about the whole of the source. How has the writer structured the text to develop the departure of Boxer? You could write about: What the writer focuses your attention on at the beginning of the text how and why the writer changes the focus as the extract develops any other structural features that you think help to develop the meeting Q4. [AO4] Focus this part of your answer on the second half of the source, from line 17 to the end. A teacher having read this text said: I like how the writer helps my students to feel involved in this moment. It is as if they are at the farm with the animals. To what extent do you agree? In your response, you could: write about your own impressions of the characters evaluate how the writer has created these impressions support your opinions with quotations from the text. [20 marks] Enduring Love from chapter 1 The narrator, Gadd and other men are trying to stop a hot air balloon from flying off. Inside the basket is a terrified boy. A mighty fist of wind socked the balloon in two rapid blows, one-two, the second more vicious than the first. It jerked Gadd right out of the basket on to the ground, and with Gadd's considerable weight removed from the equation, it lifted the balloon five feet or so, straight into the air. The rope ran through my grip, scorching my palms, but I managed to keep hold, with two feet of line 5 spare, The others kept hold too. The basket was right above our heads now, and we stood with arms upraised like Sunday bell ringers. Into our amazed silence, before the shouting could resume, the second punch came and knocked the balloon up and westwards. Suddenly we were treading the air with all our weight in the grip of our fists. 10 Almost simultaneous, with the desire to stay on the rope and save the boy, came other thoughts, thoughts of self preservation and fear. We were rising, and the ground was dropping away as the balloon was pushed upwards. I knew I had to get my legs and feet locked round the rope. But the end of the line barely reached below my waist and my grip was slipping. My legs flailed in 15 the empty air. Every fraction of a second that passed increased the drop, and the point must come when to let go would be impossible or fatal. Then, someone did let go. Immediately, the balloon and its hangers on lurched upwards another several feet. But letting go was in our nature too. The child was not my child, and I was not 20 going to die for it. Then I glimpsed another body fall away and I felt the balloon lurch upwards. The matter was settled. Altruism had no place. Being good made no sense. I let go and fell, I reckon, about twelve feet. I landed heavily on my side, I got away with a bruised thigh. Around me - before or after, I'm not so sure - bodies were thumping to the ground. 25 By the time I got to my feet the balloon was fifty yards away, and one man was still dangling by his rope, all his energies concentrated in his weakening grip. He was already a tiny figure and as the balloon and its basket lifted away and westwards, the smaller he became and the more terrible it was. Our silence was a kind of acceptance, a death warrant. Or it was horrified shame. He had been 30 on the rope so long that I began to think he might stay there until the balloon drifted down. But even as I had that hope we saw him slip down right to the end of the rope. And still he hung there. For two seconds, three, four. And then he let ruthless gravity played its part. And from somewhere a thin squawk cut through go and the stilled air. He fell as he had hung, a stiff little black stick. I've never 35 seen such a terrible thing as that falling man. Q1 Read again the first part of the source, lines 1 to 10. List four details from this paragraph that describe the helplessness of the men. A B C D [4 marks] Q2 [AO2 - language] Look in detail at this extract from lines 10 to 25 of the source: Almost simultaneous, with the desire to stay on the rope and save the boy, came other thoughts, thoughts of self preservation and fear. We were rising, and the ground was dropping away as the balloon was pushed upwards. I knew I had to get my legs and feet locked round the rope. But the end of the line barely reached below my waist and my grip was slipping. My legs flailed in 15 the empty air. Every fraction of a second that passed increased the drop, and the point must come when to let go would be impossible or fatal. Then, someone did let go. Immediately, the balloon and its hangers on lurched upwards another several feet. But letting go was in our nature too. The child was not my child, and I was not 20 going to die for it. Then I glimpsed another body fall away and I felt the balloon lurch upwards. The matter was settled. Altruism had no place. Being good made no sense. I let go and fell, I reckon, about twelve feet. I landed heavily on my side, I got away with a bruised thigh. Around me - before or after, I'm not so sure - bodies were thumping to the ground. 25 How does the writer use language here to describe the narrator s predicament? You could include the writer s choice of: words and phrases language features and techniques sentence forms. Q3 structure You now need to think about the whole of the source. This text is from a novel. How has the writer structured the text to interest you as a reader? You could write about: what the writer focuses your attention on at the beginning how and why the writer changes this focus as the extract develops any other structural features that interest you. Q4 [AO4 - evaluate with reference] Focus this part of your answer on the second half of the source, from line 26 to the end. A student, having read this section of the text said: The writer vividly conveys The horror of the situation. It is as if you are there with the narrator. To what extent do you agree? In your response, you should: write about your own impressions of what the narrator sees evaluate how the writer has created these impressions support your opinions with quotations from the text. [20 marks] Holiday Memory Dylan Thomas Dusk came down; or grew up out of the sands and the sea; or curled around us from the calling docks and the bloodily smoking sun. The day was done, the sands brushed and ruffled suddenly with a sea-brush of cold wind. We gathered together all the spades and buckets and towels, empty hampers and bottles, umbrellas, bats and balls, and we went -oh, listen, Dad!- to the Fair in the dusk on the bald 5 seaside field. Fairs were no good in the day; then they were shoddy and tired; the voices of hoopla girls were crimped as elocutionists; no cannonball could shake the roosting coconut
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