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Annotated Bibliography The effects of materialism on children and adolescents in lower-income families Alexis Vasquez-Morgan Professor Malcolm Campbell UWRT 1103 October 24, 2016 Vasquez-Morgan 1 Alexis Vasquez-Morgan Professor Campbell UWRT 1103 October 24, 2016 Annotated Bibliography Carney, Jack. Poverty & Mental Illness: You Can't Have One Without the Other. Mad In America. MIA Foundation, 07 Mar. 2012. Web. 17 Oct. 2016. Being poor and being mentally ill seem to go hand in hand accor
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    Annotated Bibliography   The effects of materialism on children and adolescents in lower-income families   Alexis Vasquez-Morgan   Professor Malcolm Campbell   UWRT 1103   October 24, 2016      Vasquez-Morgan 1 Alexis Vasquez-Morgan   Professor Campbell   UWRT 1103   October 24, 2016   Annotated Bibliography   Carney, Jack. Poverty & Mental Illness: You Can't Have One Without the Other. Mad In   America. MIA Foundation, 07 Mar. 2012. Web. 17 Oct. 2016.   Being poor and being mentally ill seem to go hand in hand according to various sources including the Census Bureau, which tells us that in 2010 4.1 million people between 18 and 64 reported a disability and also lived below the poverty line. An additional 10.9 million people claimed disability, but did not report living below the poverty line. While it is unknown whether or not these disabilities are mental illnesses, the National Institute of Mental Health declares that in 2008, 5 percent of the American population was mentally ill. With a 2008 US population of 304.1 million, that equals to be approximately 15 million with serious mental illness. One issue with those statistics, however, is the possibility that the self-reporting of mental illness is not an accurate reflection of the actual situation.   To understand further the connection between poverty and mental illness, the article includes statistics from the Department of Health and Human Services, which says that the  poverty line for a single person in 2011 was $10,890. In January of 2012, the 8.1 million people eligible for Supplemental Security Income due to disability would only receive an average annual income of $8,064. This is almost $3,000 below the poverty line. 34 percent (2.7 million)    Vasquez-Morgan 2 of the eligible have been diagnosed with serious mental illness, according to the Office of Retirement and Disability Policy of the Social Security Administration.   Information presented in the article shows that mental illness and poverty directly correlate, but mental illness was not the overwhelming cause of poverty like once thought. M. Harvey Brenner of Harvard University showed in a 1973 study that unemployment was a cause of mental illness. The data is now historical, but it set a precedent for Christopher Hu dson’s 2005 research that shows mental illness is a result of poverty and economic hardship and not the other way around. His studies revealed that increased economic hardship within a community led to increased mental illness and psychiatric hospitalization, and in conclusion noticed “a remarkably strong and consistent negative correlation between socio-economic conditions and mental illness, one that supports the role of social causation in mental illness and cannot be accounted for by geographic or econ omic downward mobility …” This article was written by a Doctor of Social Welfare for a Mad In America Foundation website, and the sources used to support the ideas are reliable and academic, and come from researchers at universities and government statistics, making this source reliable. It will be included within my essay because it supports the idea that mental illness stems from poverty, and although detailed connections between mental illness and poverty are not made, it can be inferred through continued academic research that heightened materialism may be an effect of it. In fact, this idea is supported in a later source.   Economic Status and Abuse | Dual Diagnosis. Dual Diagnosis. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Oct. 2016. This webpage on DualDiagnosis.org outlines links between economic status and reasons for substance abuse, including education, abuse and neglect, genetics, mental health, race,    Vasquez-Morgan 3  parental abuse, and poverty versus wealth. The overarching theme is that those in poverty show a higher likelihood of substance abuse due to heightened rates of mental illness, neglect, and  parental drug abuse, and a decrease in education. Under the Education heading, the first sentence says that those with higher educations are less likely to be abusers, and then gives survey evidence and the source link. Exploring this source provides less-than-ideal discoveries, however. Despite the webpage being published in 2015, the supporting source is an article published in 1987, which seems to have a bias against the poor and lacks insight as to why  the drug epidemics it mentions occurred. It mentions a spike in cocaine addiction in the late 1800s while failing to realize the widespread medical use of cocaine in the 1880s, and points fingers at low-income communities for having a continuing crack cocaine epidemic, which is likely caused by potentially government-sanctioned crack cocaine distribution to those specific areas in the 1980s. While the rest of the sources are recent and provide further insight into the causes of substance abuse, the information under the Education heading is likely not fresh enough to be accurate.   Other sources, however, led to insightful discoveries that allowed for an expansion of my thoughts and eventually, EIP topic. Under Mental Illness, it is said that 29 percent of Americans with mental illness also have a substance abuse issue, and severe mental illness is most common among Americans with a household income of less than $20,000 per year. This directly opposes my srcinal claim that the rich are more likely to have issues in relation to materialism, and therefore abuse drugs more often. It does, however, show that perhaps rich Americans are not the most materialistic, and do not feel the stresses of advertisement envy along with the obvious stresses caused by living with very little money. This new insight led to a revision of my topic to focus on the culture of the impoverished, and will be included in my essay. This entire source
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