Annotated work sample portfolios are provided to support implementation of the Foundation Year 10 Australian Curriculum. - PDF

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Work sample portfolio summary WORK SAMPLE PORTFOLIO Annotated work sample portfolios are provided to support implementation of the Foundation Year 10 Australian Curriculum. Each portfolio is an example
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Work sample portfolio summary WORK SAMPLE PORTFOLIO Annotated work sample portfolios are provided to support implementation of the Foundation Year 10 Australian Curriculum. Each portfolio is an example of evidence of student learning in relation to the achievement standard. Three portfolios are available for each achievement standard, illustrating satisfactory, above satisfactory and below satisfactory student achievement. The set of portfolios assists teachers to make on-balance judgements about the quality of their students achievement. Each portfolio comprises a collection of students work drawn from a range of assessment tasks. There is no predetermined number of student work samples in a portfolio, nor are they sequenced in any particular order. Each work sample in the portfolio may vary in terms of how much student time was involved in undertaking the task or the degree of support provided by the teacher. The portfolios comprise authentic samples of student work and may contain errors such as spelling mistakes and other inaccuracies. Opinions expressed in student work are those of the student. The portfolios have been selected, annotated and reviewed by classroom teachers and other curriculum experts. The portfolios will be reviewed over time. ACARA acknowledges the contribution of Australian teachers in the development of these work sample portfolios. THIS PORTFOLIO: YEAR 4 ENGLISH This portfolio provides the following student work samples: Sample 1 Sample 2 Sample 3 Sample 4 Sample 5 Sample 6 Sample 7 Sample 8 Persuasive letter: The Red Poppy Written response to questions: The Burnt Stick and Stolen Girl Information report: Puppies Character portrait: The Little Wooden Horse Sharing of ideas: Stranded Interview: Jeannie Baker Comparing texts: The thylacine Descriptive sensory poem: A walk in the bush This portfolio of student work includes responses to a variety of texts and the development of a range of written and oral texts. The student makes connections between texts and own experiences (WS2, WS4, WS5, WS6, WS7, WS8) and expresses a point of view about texts (WS1, WS2, WS4, WS8). The student uses a variety of language features to develop descriptive and cohesive literary, informative and persuasive texts (WS1, WS2, WS3, WS4, WS5, WS6, WS7, WS8). The student collaborates with others in group discussions and presents engaging, oral presentations (WS5, WS6, WS8). COPYRIGHT Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, you may view, download, display, print, reproduce (such as by making photocopies) and distribute these materials in unaltered form only for your personal, non-commercial educational purposes or for the non-commercial educational purposes of your organisation, provided that you retain this copyright notice. For the avoidance of doubt, this means that you cannot edit, modify or adapt any of these materials and you cannot sub-license any of these materials to others. Apart from any uses permitted under the Act 1968 (Cth), and those explicitly granted above, all other rights are reserved by ACARA. For further information, refer to (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/home/copyright) Edition Page 1 of 20 Work sample 1 Persuasive letter: The Red Poppy Year 4 English achievement standard The parts of the achievement standard targeted in the assessment task are highlighted. Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing) By the end of Year 4, students understand that texts have different text structures depending on purpose and audience. They explain how language features, images and vocabulary are used to engage the interest of audiences. They describe literal and implied meaning connecting ideas in different texts. They express preferences for particular texts, and respond to others viewpoints. They listen for key points in discussions. Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating) Students use language features to create coherence and add detail to their texts. They understand how to express an opinion based on information in a text. They create texts that show understanding of how images and detail can be used to extend key ideas. Students create structured texts to explain ideas for different audiences. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, varying language according to context. They demonstrate understanding of grammar, select vocabulary from a range of resources and use accurate spelling and punctuation, editing their work to improve meaning. Summary of task Students read the text The Red Poppy by David Hill as part of a unit on Anzac Day. Students were asked to write a letter to the school teacher-librarian asking her to acquire this book for the library. The teacher re-read the book aloud, students discussed the different themes of the book and key words were written on the board. Students had a brief planning time and wrote this first draft in approximately 40 minutes. They were asked to edit their work in red pencil Edition Page 2 of 20 Work sample 1 Persuasive letter: The Red Poppy Uses an appropriate level of formality for the audience. Uses some expanded noun groups/ phrases, for example, this amazing book called The Red Poppy. Writes a structured persuasive text. Responds to the characters and events in a text. Uses new vocabulary to express greater precision of meaning. Uses accurate sentence boundary punctuation with some capitalisation for proper nouns. Responds to print and visual information in texts and makes inferences. Uses mostly accurate spelling and attempts unknown words, for example, fourght/fought. Uses a variety of sentence structures including some complex sentences. Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, a more restrictive licence applies. For more information, please see the first page of this set of work samples and the copyright notice on the Australian Curriculum website (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/home/copyright) Edition Page 3 of 20 Work sample 2 Written response to questions: The Burnt Stick and Stolen Girl Year 4 English achievement standard The parts of the achievement standard targeted in the assessment task are highlighted. Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing) By the end of Year 4, students understand that texts have different text structures depending on purpose and audience. They explain how language features, images and vocabulary are used to engage the interest of audiences. They describe literal and implied meaning connecting ideas in different texts. They express preferences for particular texts, and respond to others viewpoints. They listen for key points in discussions. Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating) Students use language features to create coherence and add detail to their texts. They understand how to express an opinion based on information in a text. They create texts that show understanding of how images and detail can be used to extend key ideas. Students create structured texts to explain ideas for different audiences. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, varying language according to context. They demonstrate understanding of grammar, select vocabulary from a range of resources and use accurate spelling and punctuation, editing their work to improve meaning. Summary of task The teacher read the texts The Burnt Stick by Anthony Hall and Stolen Girl by Trina Saffioti while students took notes about connections made, wrote questions they had and made comments about the illustrations. Students were asked to respond to a set of reflective questions that included: explaining their reactions and feelings about the text stating their connections with the text explaining the point of view of the text making a comment on the themes and issues presented in the text Edition Page 4 of 20 Work sample 2 Written response to questions: The Burnt Stick and Stolen Girl Recalls literal information from a text. Makes a personal connection to an event in a text. Identifies the point of view of a character in a text. Uses learned vocabulary appropriate to the topic, for example, true family and culture. Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, a more restrictive licence applies. For more information, please see the first page of this set of work samples and the copyright notice on the Australian Curriculum website (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/home/copyright) Edition Page 5 of 20 Work sample 2 Written response to questions: The Burnt Stick and Stolen Girl Expresses an opinion based on events in a text. Uses compound and complex sentences to express and link ideas. Uses mostly accurate spelling and punctuation. Identifies the author s purpose in writing a text. Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, a more restrictive licence applies. For more information, please see the first page of this set of work samples and the copyright notice on the Australian Curriculum website (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/home/copyright) Edition Page 6 of 20 Work sample 3 Information report: Puppies Year 4 English achievement standard The parts of the achievement standard targeted in the assessment task are highlighted. Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing) By the end of Year 4, students understand that texts have different text structures depending on purpose and audience. They explain how language features, images and vocabulary are used to engage the interest of audiences. They describe literal and implied meaning connecting ideas in different texts. They express preferences for particular texts, and respond to others viewpoints. They listen for key points in discussions. Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating) Students use language features to create coherence and add detail to their texts. They understand how to express an opinion based on information in a text. They create texts that show understanding of how images and detail can be used to extend key ideas. Students create structured texts to explain ideas for different audiences. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, varying language according to context. They demonstrate understanding of grammar, select vocabulary from a range of resources and use accurate spelling and punctuation, editing their work to improve meaning. Summary of task The students were asked to complete an information report about a topic of interest. They researched their topic using the internet and books. The students identified information they found interesting and then rewrote the information in their own words. They planned their information report before writing and edited their work with a specific focus on the use of topic sentences, paragraphs, punctuation and correct spelling Edition Page 7 of 20 Work sample 3 Information report: Puppies Constructs a plan to guide writing. Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, a more restrictive licence applies. For more information, please see the first page of this set of work samples and the copyright notice on the Australian Curriculum website (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/home/ copyright) Edition Page 8 of 20 Work sample 3 Information report: Puppies Writes an information report using elements of the basic structure. Uses simple, compound and complex sentences to provide and link information. Selects and organises researched information. Uses the language of factual reporting rather than of opinion. Uses some new vocabulary encountered in research, for example, golden retriever, herding dog. Shows evidence of editing by adding words to improve clarity of meaning. Includes relevant detail and provides some technical information relevant to the topic. Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, a more restrictive licence applies. For more information, please see the first page of this set of work samples and the copyright notice on the Australian Curriculum website (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/home/ copyright) Edition Page 9 of 20 Work sample 3 Information report: Puppies Uses accurate spelling and punctuation. Uses subheadings and paragraphing to organise information in a text. Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, a more restrictive licence applies. For more information, please see the first page of this set of work samples and the copyright notice on the Australian Curriculum website (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/home/ copyright) Edition Page 10 of 20 Work sample 4 Character portrait: The Little Wooden Horse Year 4 English achievement standard The parts of the achievement standard targeted in the assessment task are highlighted. Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing) By the end of Year 4, students understand that texts have different text structures depending on purpose and audience. They explain how language features, images and vocabulary are used to engage the interest of audiences. They describe literal and implied meaning connecting ideas in different texts. They express preferences for particular texts, and respond to others viewpoints. They listen for key points in discussions. Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating) Students use language features to create coherence and add detail to their texts. They understand how to express an opinion based on information in a text. They create texts that show understanding of how images and detail can be used to extend key ideas. Students create structured texts to explain ideas for different audiences. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, varying language according to context. They demonstrate understanding of grammar, select vocabulary from a range of resources and use accurate spelling and punctuation, editing their work to improve meaning. Summary of task Students read the text The Little Wooden Horse by Mark Wilson. The teacher modelled how to construct a character portrait and use it to write a description of Tom, one of the characters in the text. Students were asked to research the character of Elizabeth and, using the format of the modelled character portrait and written description, to create their own written description of Elizabeth Edition Page 11 of 20 Work sample 4 Character portrait: The Little Wooden Horse Recalls literal information and events from a text. Uses mostly accurate spelling and punctuation. Uses noun group/phrases to create an effective description, for example, a young boy about five. Uses simple, compound and complex sentences to express and link ideas. Adds detail to a description to highlight social, cultural and historical context. Demonstrates understanding of the point of view of a child convict. Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, a more restrictive licence applies. For more information, please see the first page of this set of work samples and the copyright notice on the Australian Curriculum website (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/home/copyright) Edition Page 12 of 20 Work sample 5 Sharing of ideas: Stranded Year 4 English achievement standard The parts of the achievement standard targeted in the assessment task are highlighted. Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing) By the end of Year 4, students understand that texts have different text structures depending on purpose and audience. They explain how language features, images and vocabulary are used to engage the interest of audiences. They describe literal and implied meaning connecting ideas in different texts. They express preferences for particular texts, and respond to others viewpoints. They listen for key points in discussions. Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating) Students use language features to create coherence and add detail to their texts. They understand how to express an opinion based on information in a text. They create texts that show understanding of how images and detail can be used to extend key ideas. Students create structured texts to explain ideas for different audiences. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, varying language according to context. They demonstrate understanding of grammar, select vocabulary from a range of resources and use accurate spelling and punctuation, editing their work to improve meaning. Summary of task Students read the text Stranded by Jan Ramage and engaged in various activities to explore the text, the main character and his motivations. They considered how he displayed the emotions and qualities of fear, loyalty and bravery in his actions with the stranded whale. Students were asked to discuss the text and illustrations and to consider the events and the feelings and motivations of the main character Edition Page 13 of 20 Work sample 5 Sharing of ideas: Stranded Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, a more restrictive licence applies. For more information, please see the first page of this set of work samples and the copyright notice on the Australian Curriculum website (http://www.australiancurriculum. edu.au/home/copyright) Edition Page 14 of 20 Work sample 6 Interview: Jeannie Baker Year 4 English achievement standard The parts of the achievement standard targeted in the assessment task are highlighted. Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing) By the end of Year 4, students understand that texts have different text structures depending on purpose and audience. They explain how language features, images and vocabulary are used to engage the interest of audiences. They describe literal and implied meaning connecting ideas in different texts. They express preferences for particular texts, and respond to others viewpoints. They listen for key points in discussions. Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating) Students use language features to create coherence and add detail to their texts. They understand how to express an opinion based on information in a text. They create texts that show understanding of how images and detail can be used to extend key ideas. Students create structured texts to explain ideas for different audiences. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, varying language according to context. They demonstrate understanding of grammar, select vocabulary from a range of resources and use accurate spelling and punctuation, editing their work to improve meaning. Summary of task Students were asked to create and conduct an interview with the author Jeannie Baker. Students took on different roles: media reporter, interviewer and the author. They had researched online background information about Jeannie Baker which was incorporated into their script. The students wrote the script and selected prompts and costumes suitable for the task. This work sample is of two students presenting a mock interview Edition Page 15 of 20 Work sample 6 Interview: Jeannie Baker Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, a more restrictive licence applies. For more information, ple
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