UK Multilateral Aid Review

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Renewed and robust support for the principle of multilateralism and multilateral institutions is absolutely essential, especially by a country as significant in international development as the UK. Oxfam supports multilateral aid remaining at around the current level of UK overall ODA. The Global Fund for HIV, Tuberculosis and Malaria has a proven track record of results-oriented delivery, saving over 5 million lives since its inception. Oxfam believes strong continued UK support for the Global Fund is essential. As part of the replenishment process in 2010 the UK should contribute its share -
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  www.oxfam.org.uk Oxfam GB Public Submission UK Multilateral Aid Review Oxfam GB August 2010   UK Multilateral Aid Review  , Oxfam GB, August 2010 2 Executive Summary Renewed and robust support for the principle of multilateralism and multilateral institutions is absolutely essential, especially by a country as significant in international development as the UK. Oxfam supports multilateral aid remaining at around the current level of UK overall ODA. The UK should continue to use its influence within the multilateral development agencies to bring about improvements in their governance. The Global Fund for HIV, Tuberculosis and Malaria has a proven track record of results-oriented delivery, saving over 5 million lives since its inception. Oxfam believes strong continued UK support for the Global Fund is essential. As part of the replenishment process in 2010 the UK should contribute its share - £840m. Oxfam supports the UK‟s continued financing of the World Bank International Development Association (IDA). However, due to a lack of clarity as to its effectiveness and delivery of results, its failure to target the poorest, and particularly the continued failure to support progressive policies in areas such as health, we would not support the UK‟s financing to IDA increasing beyond the replenishment level of IDA 15 (in real terms). Within IDA, Oxfam supports comprehensive reform and rationalisation of the Country Policy Institutional Assessment (CPIA) to focus on fewer, and only poverty-focused, outcomes. Oxfam is calling for a Global Fund for Education - An Education For All Fast Track Initiative that is operationally and politically independent from the World Bank, with the Bank acting strictly as a trustee of FTI resources. The UK should meet its share of the education funding gap of US$11 billion and agree to create a new instrument for disbursement, and a way to ensure funding for education to donor orphan countries and fragile states. Oxfam research has shown aid delivered by the European Commission (EC), and in particular its budget support, to represent some of the best multilateral aid in the world. We support continued and, where appropriate, increased commitments to EC aid by the UK, especially support for the expansion of MDG contracts to more countries. One vital part of the UK's humanitarian assistance should be substantial funding for the relevant UN organisations. Through that funding, the UK can leverage important improvements in UN performance. In order to facilitate rapid emergency response, DFID should allocate a proportion of its humanitarian/emergency funds directly to NGOs, who are well placed to implement emergency programmes including in remote locations.   UK Multilateral Aid Review  , Oxfam GB, August 2010 3 1. Introduction 1.1   Oxfam welcomes the opportunity to contribute to DFID‟s Multilateral Aid Review. In this instance, we will confine our comments to aid delivered through the: Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria; World Bank, and more particularly its International Development Association (IDA) funding arm; Education Fast Track Initiative; European Union (EU), specifically the European Development Fund (EDF), the Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI) and its humanitarian department, ECHO; UN humanitarian agencies, including the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), United Nations Children‟s Fund ( UNICEF), United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) and World Food Programme (WFP); as well as pooled funding mechanisms such as CERF, and UNITAID UN Adaptation Fund. We look forward to offering the experience of our staff in countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America at further points during the multilateral aid review process, and to help inform UK policy-making in the future. 2. The importance of multilateralism 2.1  Multilateralism is central to the fight against poverty and inequality. Its role remains critical for states to work together to protect and develop the rights and opportunities of citizens. The world community has come to a crossroads in trying to address interlinked crises involving food, fuel, climate change, the global financial and economic system, increasing insecurity, and ongoing problems of poverty and inequality. Despite its limitations, multilateralism remains the key avenue through which to deal with these crises. Renewed and robust support, by a country as significant internationally as the UK, for the principle of multilateralism and multilateral institutions in the 21st century is essential. 3. Preserving UK influence 3.1   The UK‟s international influence depends, to a significant extent, on being a leader in finding solutions to global problems including poverty, insecurity, climate change and humanitarian crises. The UK maintains a global leadership position on international development policy, sustained by the International Development Act 2002, its commitment to reach 0.7% GNI in ODA by 2013, and its respect for (and in some cases going beyond) OECD DAC Guidelines, and Paris and Accra commitments. The UK has an essential role to play in promoting this good practice in multilateral development agencies. 3.2  This requires a continued scaling up of the overall level of aid going through multilateral development agencies in line with a year-on-year increasing budget as we move towards 0.7%, recognising their important role in coordinating global development efforts and in delivering aid predictably to support country-led programs. Oxfam supports multilateral aid remaining at around the current level of UK overall ODA.   UK Multilateral Aid Review  , Oxfam GB, August 2010 4 3.3   The focus of the UK‟s scaling -up of support to multilateral development agencies should be on those agencies that display the most effective, pro-poor approaches to aid effectiveness, promoting poverty reduction, accountability, transparency, ownership and results. 3.4  The UK should continue to use its influence within the multilateral development agencies to ensure their governance becomes more democratic and their policies and practices better support poverty reduction, accountability, transparency and ownership, building on progressive approaches shown by agencies such as the European Commission. 3.5  The UK has a greater global reach because of its stake in multilateral agencies, encouraging multilateral development agencies to adopt those good practices employed by the UK in its own international development policy. 4. Global Fund for HIV, Tuberculosis and Malaria –  preventing diseases, providing care and support and saving lives 1   4.1   The Global Fund is the greatest multilateral achievement of the last decade, and arguably the most profound step the G8 has made towards tackling poverty and meeting the MDGs. „Every day, programmes supported by the Global Fund save at least 3,600 lives, prevent thousands of new infections and alleviate untold suffering‟ 2  (The Global Fund 2010: Innovation and Impact). The Global Fund is a multilateral development agency leader in the area of delivering results, and value for money.   The Global Fund has a proven track record of results-orientated delivery, saving over 5 million lives since its inception. Oxfam believes strong continued UK support for the Global Fund is essential. As part of the replenishment process in 2010, the UK should contribute £840m.   4.2   The achievements of the Fund 3   are clear: 2.3 million people receiving antiretroviral treatment; delivery of 88 million bed nets and 74 million malaria drug treatments; 5.4 million additional cases of TB detected and treated. Also important has been its commitment to the participation of civil society. More needs to be done to enable the Global Fund to take on health systems issues more broadly and function more as a Global Fund for Health.   4. 3   On fighting malaria alone –  a top DFID priority –  by the end of 2009, Global Fund-supported programmes had distributed 104 million insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) to prevent malaria. They also supported indoor residual spraying of accordance with national treatment guidelines. Approved malaria proposals have totalled US$ 5.3 billion covering 83 countries. In conjunction with re-energized national and international efforts to combat malaria, increased Global Fund financing is having a substantial impact on malaria morbidity and mortality worldwide, with an increasing number of countries reporting a reduction in malaria deaths of more than 50 percent. 4   1  For further see http://www.theglobalfund.org/documents/replenishment/2010/Global_Fund_2010_Innovation_and_ Impact_en.pdf Oxfam GB endorses the findings and recommendations of this report.  2  op cit 3  For further see http://www.oxfam.org.uk/resources/policy/climate_change/downloads/bp_132_beyond_aid_150909 _web.pdf 4  op cit
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