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“What Is Your Life’s Blueprint?” Ernest Green Lesson Plan by Ashley Ralston Hands-On History Coordinator, Historic Arkansas Museum Butler Center for Arkansas Studies 2007-2008 School Year Utilizing 2006 Arkansas Social Studies Frameworks Plus Other Curriculum Frameworks Including 2007 School Library Media Frameworks The
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    “ What Is Your Life’s Blueprint?” Ernest Green Lesson Plan by Ashley Ralston Hands-On History Coordinator, Historic Arkansas Museum Butler Center for Arkansas Studies 2007-2008 School Year Utilizing 2006 Arkansas Social Studies Frameworks Plus Other Curriculum Frameworks Including 2007 School Library Media Frameworks The May Section from 2008 Encyclopedia of Arkansas History & Culture   Calendar   features a photograph of “Ernest Green” as he prepares for his high school graduation from Little Rock Central High School. Calendars can be ordered annually by emailing info@encyclopeidaofarkansas.net See links from the AV/AR digital collection featuring audio clips from an interview with Ernest Green at http://www.butlercenter.org/online-collections/index.html .  Students will analyze primary source documents to understand the Jim Crow south and the role it played in Arkansas education. Students will take this information and see how it connects with the teachings of Martin Luther King Jr. and the influence he had on individuals, such as Ernest Green. Grades: 9 th  - 12 th   Objectives: 1. Students will be able to analyze primary source documents to understand relations in Arkansas during the Civil Rights Movement. 2. Students will be able to connect prior information and relate it to understand a specific time in history and change throughout time. 3. Students will be able to discuss new information and format it into a written argument.  Arkansas Curriculum Frameworks:  Arkansas History Student Learning Expectations: WWP.9.AH.9-12.4 -  Analyze the civil rights movement in Arkansas using primary and secondary sources Social Studies Student Learning Expectations: Civics/American Government C.1.CAG.5 - Explain and apply citizenship concepts to everyday life  C.2.CAG.2 - Distinguish between rights and privileges of citizenship  USC.7.CAG.4 -  Analyze court cases that demonstrate how the United States Constitution protects the rights of individuals  USC.7.CAG.5 - Examine changes in civil rights legislation      English Language Arts Student Learning Expectations: OV.1.10.2 - Prepare and participate in informal discussions and activities, such as presentations, group discussions/work teams, and debates…  OV.3.9.2 -  Articulate personal response to such media as editorials, news stories and advertisements  W.4.9.1 - Generate, gather and organize ideas for writing School Library Media Student Learning Expectations : I.1.9.9, I.1.10.9, I.1.11.10, I.1.12.10  – Distinguish between primary  and secondary   sources I.2.9.2, I.2.10.2, I.2.11.2, I.2.12.2  – Evaluate primary  and secondary sources  A.4.9.1, A.4.10.1, A.4.11.1, A.4.12.1  – Use resources and/or technology tools for a predetermined task NCSS Thematic Standards: Culture Time, Continuity and Change People, Places and Environment Individual Development and Identity Power, Authority and Governance Individuals, Groups and Institutions Civic Ideals and Practices Related Encyclopedia of Arkansas Entries: Civil Rights Movement (Twentieth Century); Ernest Gideon Green; Jim Crow Laws; Segregation and Desegregation  Related AV/AR Selected Materials: Ernest Green audio clip 03 – He discusses why he wanted to go to Central High School. Ernest Green audio clip 04 – He discusses the harassment at Central High School. Ernest Green audio clip 11 – He discusses what is was like inside Central High School. Ernest Green audio clip 17 – He talks about segregation and why he thought he should be allowed to attend Central High School. Introduction: The teacher will select the appropriate student learning expectations for his or her class, review key terms/people, and make copies of attached worksheet or primary source document as needed. Collaboration with the school library media specialist for assistance in the utilization of the technology resource tool for  Arkansas History is suggested. See above links or visit the online Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture at http://www.encylopediaofarkansas.net. Key Terms/People: Civil Rights Movement Jim Crow Laws Segregation Ernest Green Martin Luther King, Jr.    Key Terms/People: Civil Rights Movement - The movement for racial equality in the United States that broke the pattern of racial segregation and achieved political equality among races.  Jim Crow Laws -  A system of laws used in the southern United States to restrict the rights of African Americans, in both, the private and political sphere.  Segregation -  A lawful means of separating races.  Ernest Green - One of the Little Rock Nine, who broke boundaries by helping to speed up the desegregation of Arkansas schools. Martin Luther King Jr.- Leader of the Civil Rights Movement, who spoke for peace and equality among people.  Materials Needed: Writing Utensils Notebook (Discussion questions may be entered in notebooks as answers to journal questions) Jim Crow in Arkansas Analysis Sheet Internet Access (Ernest Green Describes Experience at Central High) “What is Your Life’s Blueprint?” Suggested Timeline: Two 50 minute class periods Procedure: Students will begin by answering the discussion question:    What was life like for African Americans before segregation? Students should brainstorm as a class and create a list on the board of issues. Students will then be placed into groups (2-4 per group), according to class size. Next, the teacher will hand out Jim Crow in Arkansas Analysis Sheet.  After the groups have completed their analysis, ask them to share some of their answers with the class. This will allow for a well rounded discussion on the affect of Jim Crow in Arkansas.  Activity: Have students read: Ernest Green Describes Experience at Central High Special to the Arkansas News http://www.oldstatehouse.com/educational_programs/classroom/arkansas_news/detail.asp?id+46&issue_id=5&page=4  As students are reading the article, ask them to underline the various instances    in which Green writes of Martin Luther King Jr. and the influence he had in his life. Next, allow students to answer the following discussion questions:    How did Jim Crow laws personally affect the life of Ernest Green?    Why did Green make the decision to become one of the Little Rock Nine?    How did Dr. King inspire the actions of Green?  After students have discussed various answers, assign them the task of writing a thank you letter from Ernest Green to Dr. King. Ask students to cite examples from Green’s writing in their work. Evaluation:  As a closing, ask students to examine the “What is Your Life’s Blueprint?” sheet.  As students read, have them answer the questions found within the text and finish by completing the paragraph and/or diagram mentioned in the last bulletin.  As students finish, ask them the discussion question:    How is each individual responsible for their own blueprint? Extended Activity:  Ask students to draw a line down the center of their paper. On the left side have students create a list of five people who motivate them, this list may include parents, teachers, celebrities, etc. On the other side of their line, have students list the positive characteristics of the previous individuals (i.e. giving, responsible, intelligent, etc.). At the bottom of this page ask students to list one issue that they are concerned with ( i.e. grades, college, global warming, etc.). Students should then create a paragraph identifying how the people and characteristics listed above can motivate them towards a solution. Have students answer the following discussion question:    How do the people within our lives influence our blueprint?   For assistance with gathering and using oral history, contact the Butler Center Oral History Coordinator at arkinfo@cals.org. For Further Reading: See Race Relations   in the Natural State by Grif Stockley. The textbook has been adopted by the ADE as social studies resource. Order information is available at http://www.butlercenter.org/publication/books.html Mr. Stockley has written several articles for the online Encyclopedia of Arkansas   History and Culture . Students can use the advanced search feature in the online encyclopedia to access these articles. The Taylor Foundation  (Little Rock, Arkansas) makes Butler Center lesson plans possible. Contact the Butler Center for Arkansas Studies, Central Arkansas Library System, 100 Rock St., Little Rock, AR, 72201. 501-918-3056 www.butlercenter.org and www.cals.lib.ar.us 
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