Lighten the Load: In a time of crisis, European aid has never been more important | Aid Effectiveness

Please download to get full document.

View again

of 52
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Information Report
Category:

Others

Published:

Views: 9 | Pages: 52

Extension: PDF | Download: 0

Share
Related documents
Description
Last year poor people around the world endured the consequences of the food and energy price crisis. Today, the global economic crisis is inflicting serious damage on some of the most vulnerable economies in the world, and on the poorest people. In this time of crisis European countries should, more than ever, lighten the load borne by developing countries. In the face of global economic meltdown, however, Europe is abandoning its aid promises to poor countries, who are being hit hard by a crisis they have not caused. Oxfam International, as member of CONCORD, the European confederation of development NGOs, is taking part in the launch of a pan-European report aimed at raising awareness of the importance of keeping governments to account on promises for more and better aid.
Transcript
  1   E  u r  o  p  e  a n N  G  O  c  o n f   e  d  e r  a  t  i    o n f   o r r  e l   i    e f   a n  d  d  e v  e l    o  p m e n  t    C  o n f   é   d  é  r  a  t  i    o n  e  u r  o  p  é   e n n  e  d  e  s  O N  G  d ’   u r  g  e n  c  e  e  t   d  e  d  é  v  e l    o  p  p  e m e n  t     Lighten the load In a time of crisis, European aid has never been more important  CONTENTS Executive Summary .............................................................................................................................................2Part I: Analysis of European aid quality and quantity ........................................................................................41. Aid in time of crisis .........................................................................................................................................4  A financial tsunami: the impact on poor countries ........................................................................4Poverty: the perennial crisis and the need for aid .........................................................................5 2. Europe’s aid commitments .............................................................................................................................6 Getting more out of aid ................................................................................................................6 3. Aid progress in Europe: not making the grade ...............................................................................................74. No cause for celebration: European aid inflation still a problem...................................................................8 Debt cancellation ......................................................................................................................10Refugee costs in Europe ...........................................................................................................10Student costs ............................................................................................................................11Climate change financing ..........................................................................................................11 5. Aid effectiveness: unlocking the potential of aid? .......................................................................................11 Transparency ............................................................................................................................12Gender .....................................................................................................................................13Ownership and conditionality ....................................................................................................13 Accountability of aid .................................................................................................................14Untying aid ...............................................................................................................................14Technical assistance.................................................................................................................15Predictability of spending .........................................................................................................16Security and migration: politically motivated spending ..............................................................17Division of labour ......................................................................................................................17 6. European NGO recommendations .................................................................................................................18Part II: Country Profiles .....................................................................................................................................19Note on methodology, data sources and acronyms .........................................................................................47Endnotes ............................................................................................................................................................48 About this report ã This is the fourth year that development NGOs from all 27 EU countries have come together through the AidWatch Initiative to produce this report, under the umbrella of CONCORD, the European NGO Confederation for Relief and Development. CONCORD is the European confederation of 18 international networks and 22 national associations, representing more than 1600 European development NGOs. CONCORD members are listed on the back page of the report. CONCORD is also a member of GCAP, the Global Call to Action against Poverty. GCAP is a worldwide campaign committed to influencing world leaders to live up to their promises, and to make a breakthrough on poverty: www.whiteband.orgThis report has been written by Javier Pereira and Jasmine Burnley at CONCORD. European AidWatch Initiative ã This report is part of a broader range of work being undertaken by European development NGOs, to monitor and advocate on European aid under the aegis of the CONCORD AidWatch Initiative. AidWatch activities include lobbying and advocacy in Brussels and in European Union (EU) member States, annual and policy specific seminars, capacity building for NGOs across Europe and ongoing research on EU aid. For more information on becoming involved in the AidWatch Initiative, please contact the AidWatch Coordinator: jasmine.burnley@concordeurope.org Acknowledgements ã The production of this report has been made possible by the efforts of NGO coalitions across the EU, listed on each country page. The AidWatch Advocacy and Report groups have also played active roles in the production of the report. These groups are made up of the following individuals representing their organisations:Ales Kranjc Kuslan, Ekvilib Institute; Aoife Black, Trócaire; Bodo Ellmers, EURODAD; Els Hertogen and Wiske Jult, 11.11.11; Ester Asin-Martinez and Agnès Philippart, CONCORD Secretariat; Gaspard Denis, CNCD; Gideon Rabinowitz, UKAN; Hetty Kovach, Oxfam GB; Katia Herrgott, Coordination SUD; Iacopo Viciani and Luca de Fraia ActionAid Italy; Luisa Antolin, WIDE; Louisa Vogiazides, Eurostep; Mario Gerada, SKOP; Michael Obrovsky, ÖEFSE; Peter Sörbom, CONCORD Sweden; Petra Krylova, Arpok; Rebecca Steel, TRIALOG; Terhi Ylikoski, KEPA; Verónica Hernández, Intermón-Oxfam. For more information ã More information available at: www.concordeurope.orgDesign and layout by: Altitude – Brussels: http://www.altitude.be The cover has been drawn by Hamidou Zoetaba, a cartoonist from Burkina Faso: hamidouzoetaba@yahoo.fr.  1   Lighten the load  In a time of crisis, European aid has never been more important  2   Last year poor people around the world endured the consequences of the food and energy price crisis. Today, the global economic crisis is inflicting serious damage on some of the most vulnerable economies in the world, and on the poorest people. In this time of crisis European countries should, more than ever, lighten the load borne by developing countries. Together, European governments provided 60% of global aid flows in 2008 and have committed to lead donor countries in their fight against poverty and inequality. In order to achieve this ambitious goal, European governments have promised to increase their aid levels and improve aid quality by signing up to international commitments such as the Paris Declaration. However, this report shows that the European Union (EU) is failing to deliver on its pledges on aid quantity and quality, at just the time when poor families need it most.In 2008, Europe provided 0.40% of its gross national income (GNI) in aid. Although this is an increase of €4 billion (bn), in reality, a further €20bn is necessary over the next two years in order to meet its targets. Current rises are clearly falling far short of what is needed, and according to official estimates by the European Commission, the EU will not reach its 2010 collective 0.56% of GNI target until 2012. Many of the 15 old Member States (EU-15) will not hit their individual aid targets of 0.51% by 2010, and neither are the 12 new Member States (EU-12) countries expected to achieve theirs of 0.17% on time. In fact, if current trends continue, a maximum of only 10 countries will meet their 2010 aid commitments. This means that Europe is way off-track on providing 0.7% of GNI in aid by 2015 - a promise made by Europe in 2002, vital for meeting the Millennium Development Goals. Among the old member states, Austria registered the biggest decrease, followed by a small drop from the Netherlands. In the group of the new member states, Bulgaria and Malta were by far the worst performers, with decreases of 27%. Hot on their heels were Estonia, which dropped by 19%, Poland by 10%, Hungary 9%, and the Czech Republic by 1%. Official aid figures therefore reveal that Europe will not live up to its international commitments for 2010. But, these figures also conceal further swathes of “inflated aid”. Out of the almost €50bn that European governments provided as aid in 2008, almost €5bn is debt cancellation, €2bn student costs and close to €1bn refugee costs. When these figures are discounted from the glossy official numbers, European aid for 2008 amounted to only 0.34% of collective GNI, nothing like the officially reported 0.40% and a very long distance from the 2010 target of 0.56%. If current trends continue unchanged, European countries will have failed to provide €39bn of promised aid to developing countries by 2010, due to inflated aid practices and missed official targets. This amount is more than two times the size of Estonia's economy, and would be enough to increase by one quarter the daily income of the 380 million Africans living in absolute poverty. Nonetheless evidence continues to demonstrate that where delivered well, aid saves and changes lives. In Zambia, aid from the United Kingdom and other donors has supported free health care in rural areas, increasing the number of people using health facilities by 50%. Aid is much more valuable when it is sustainable, long-term and characterised by genuine development motives. It is factors like these which determine the effectiveness of aid. This year, with the detrimental impact of the food and financial crises on the most vulnerable, the quality of aid is even more crucial for developing countries, and donors must deliver.  Yet in contradiction with international commitments, aid continues to be driven by donors’ own priorities, resulting in damaging in-country power imbalances and little developing country ownership of aid processes, which reduces overall levels of aid effectiveness. Many of the core issues for aid effectiveness such as gender equality and transparency have long been on the short-list of developing country concerns, but never fully addressed. This report also shows that some European countries continue to deliver aid based on their own priorities rather than those of the poor. A number of European countries such as Italy and Sweden have pronounced in favour of broadening the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) reporting guidelines in order to enable military and peace-keeping expenses to be counted as aid. Moreover, last year France brokered a deal in the European Council allowing them to tie aid money to recipient countries’ co-operation on migration and repatriations. Many other European governments such as Malta and Italy rushed to renegotiate their aid deals on this basis. The use of aid as a political tool is unacceptable. Aid is about poverty reduction and rights, not the diplomatic relations and interests of rich governments in poor countries. Europe has proved capable of mobilising gargantuan amounts of money for their banks. Over $150 billion was mobilised for Northern Rock and Dexia alone – more than double the amount of EU aid in 2008. This shows that meeting the aid quantity commitments is not about lack of resources, but about political will and prioritisation. Europe must respond to the every day crisis faced by poor people with the same political commitment.History will judge Europe according to its actions now. If Europe fails to act we will be seen as having turned our back on the poorest in their time of need, and missed the opportunity to deliver a genuine EU development legacy. But decisive action can still be taken. Europe has the unique opportunity to have a huge impact on the lives of the world’s poorest people, and to leave a development legacy that turned the tide for poor families in a time of global crisis. Executive Summary
Recommended
View more...
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks