High Stakes: Girls' education in Afghanistan

Please download to get full document.

View again

of 43
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Information Report
Category:

Others

Published:

Views: 5 | Pages: 43

Extension: PDF | Download: 0

Share
Related documents
Description
Millions of girls have entered school in Afghanistan, since the fall of the Taliban in 2001. It is one of the few good news stories of the last nine years. However, the deteriorating security situation and the international community’s focus on stabilization and counter-insurgency rather than on long-term development means this good news story is in danger of turning bad. A new approach from both the Afghan government and donors is urgently required to hold onto the gains that have been made. This report is based on field research carried out in the summer of 2010 in 17 provinces out of a total of 34 in Afghanistan. It was conducted by Oxfam and 15 partner organisations, including 13 Afghan NGOs plus CARE and Swedish Committee of Afghanistan (SCA). Oxfam is calling on the Afghan government and donors to develop a new approach to girls’ education to hold onto gains made, and to increase access to education for girls across Afghanistan. With NATO nations preparing for withdrawal by 2014, we also want to ensure that major donors sustain their support for development, especially in the education sector, over the long term. In particular, we want the international community to focus on improving secondary and higher levels of education. They need to support the Afghan government to increase the number of female-friendly, well-equipped schools for girls, especially in rural or remote areas
Transcript
  Joint NGO Briefing Paper 24 February 2011 High Stakes Girls’ Education in Afghanistan   While millions of girls enrolled in school after the fall of the Taliban, donor and government efforts to improve education have slowed down and grow-ing insecurity is rapidly eroding access to schooling for many girls. A new approach from both the Afghan government and donors is urgently required to hold onto the gains that have been made.  1 Table of Contents   Acknowledgements………………………………………………………….…2  Acronyms and Abbreviations. …….….…………………………………….….3   Executive Summary………………………………………………………….…4   Introduction………………………………………………………………….….7   Research Findings………………………………………...………………….…9 School Attendance………………………………………………….….9   Desired Achievement……………………………….….….……….…10 Poverty……………………………………….…………………………11   Early and/or Forced Marriage……….….….…….…………….……13   Insecurity………………………………….……………….…...………14   The Role of Families and Communities………………………..…….16   Physical Access to Education…………………………….….….….…17   Education Quality…………….…….…….……………….…….…….19   Recommendations………………………………………………….….……….23   Annex A: Methodology……………………………………………………….29   Annex B: Summary of Key Findings………………………….……….…..…32   Notes………………………………..….………….…….….………..….…….…40    2  Acknowledgements   This research was jointly designed and carried out by the following organi-zations: Afghan Civil Society Forum (ACSF), Afghan Development Associ-ation (ADA), Afghan Peace and Democracy Act (APDA), Afghan Women‟s Network (AWN), Afghan Women Services and Education Organization (AWSE), All Afg han Women‟s Union (AAWU),  CARE, Cooperation Centre for Afghanistan (CCA), Coordination of Afghan Relief (CoAR), Coordina-tion of Humanitarian Assistance (CHA), Education Training Center for Poor Women and Girls of Afghanistan (ECW), Legal and Cultural Services for Afghan Women and Children (LCSAWC), Oxfam, Sanayee Develop-ment Organization (SDO), Shuhada and Swedish Committee for Afghanis-tan (SCA). The primary author of the report is Ashley Jackson. However, this project was very much the product of a collaborative effort and could not have been completed without the assistance of many individuals. In particular, the author would like to highlight the contributions made by the following people and organizations: Lynn Yoshikawa and Aliase Hassany, who srcinally led the research de-sign and helped to coordinate the field research process; Kobra Ahmadi, for her research assistance and managing the field research; the Ministry of Education (MoE) for support throughout the research process and for shar-ing their data; Louise Hancock for editing support; Nate Koach and Matt Waldman for input on the design and content; and several other individu-als who wish to remain anonymous for their inputs and support through-out the process. Dari translation provided by Jawed Nader; Pashto translation provided by Shamsullah Sampai. Above all, the author and participating organizations would like to thank the men and women across Afghanistan who shared their experiences and views with researchers during the study. Photo credits: cover photo and the photos on pages 17, 25 and 27 were tak-en by Elissa Bogos; photo on page 18 was taken by Mohammad Alam.  3  Acronyms and Abbreviations   AIHRC Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission AKDN Aga Khan Development Network  AREU Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit ARTF Afghan Reconstruction Trust Fund AOG  Armed Opposition Groups IWA  Integrity Watch Afghanistan MoE Ministry of Education NRVA  National Risk and Vulnerability Assessment NGO  Non-governmental organization PRT  Provincial Reconstruction Teams SCA Swedish Committee for Afghanistan UN United Nations UNAMA United Nations Assistance Mission Afghanistan UNICEF United Nations Children‟s Fund    WFP  World Food Program
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks