A Country Divided. Economy Industrial Building Things Slavery Free States Abolitionists. Agricultural Growing Things Slave States.

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A Country Divided North Economy Industrial Building Things Slavery Free States Abolitionists South Agricultural Growing Things Slave States Government Strong Central Government States Rights Army Union
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A Country Divided North Economy Industrial Building Things Slavery Free States Abolitionists South Agricultural Growing Things Slave States Government Strong Central Government States Rights Army Union Confederate A Country Divided Differences between northern and southern states: industrial economy agricultural economy free states slave Differences between northern and southern states: Strong Central Government government States Rights government Missouri Compromise Vocabulary Succession The separating of states from a country to form another country Rebellion To go against a government Industrial Economy based on making things Agricultural Economy based on growing things Abolitionist People fighting against slavery Union The northern army Confederacy The southern army Nat Turner Led a rebellion against plantation owners in Virginia Harriet Tubman Supported a secret route that escaped enslaved African Americans used to get north The route became known as the Underground Railroad John Brown Led a raid against a United States (Union) armory/ arsenal (where they keep their weapons) He was trying to start a slave rebellion He was captured and hanged Ulysses S. Grant Union General Defeated the Confederate Army at Richmond Robert E. Lee surrendered to him at Appomattox Court House ending the war 18th President of the United States Robert E. Lee Confederate General Surrendered to General Grant at Appomattox Court House Former Member of the United States Military Resigned to help fight for Virginia Was not in favor of slavery, but wanted to protect his home state of Virginia Thomas Stonewall Jackson Confederate General Earned his nickname after holding the line at the First Battle of Bull Run Abraham Lincoln Against slavery When he was elected President, the southern states believed he would abolish slavery Succession of States In 1860, once he was elected, some southern states seceded from the Union and formed the Confederate States of America Later, Virginia joined the Confederacy Succession of States In 1860, once he was elected, some southern states seceded from the Union and formed the Confederate States of America Later, Virginia joined the Confederacy West Virginia Natural Divide- Appalachian Mountains West Virginia Natural Divide- Appalachian Mountains West Virginia Natural Divide- Appalachian Mountains People in the Western Counties felt connected to the North (Against Slavery) People in the Eastern Counties felt connected to the South (For Slavery) After Virginia succeeded from the Union, the western counties broke apart and formed West Virginia West Virginia Natural Divide- Appalachian Mountains People in the Western Counties felt connected to the North (Against Slavery) People in the Eastern Counties felt connected to the South (For Slavery) After Virginia succeeded from the Union, the western counties broke apart and formed West Virginia The Confederate Capital Once Virginia broke away from the Union and joined the Confederacy, Richmond was named the capital of the Confederacy Civil War Battles First Battle of Bull Run (Manassas) First major clash of the Civil War Confederate General Thomas Jackson played a major role and earned his nickname, Stonewall Jackson Civil War Battles Fredericksburg Confederate General Robert E. Lee, led Virginia forces against the Union Confederate forces defeated Union forces Civil War Battles Richmond Richmond was the capital of the Confederacy Union General Ulysses S. Grant took over the city and burned it near the end of the war Civil War Battles Clash of the Ironclads President Lincoln blockaded southern ports Two iron ships battled near Norfolk and Hampton Union - Monitor Confederacy - Merrimack Civil War Battles Clash of the Ironclads President Lincoln blockaded southern ports Two iron ships battled near Norfolk and Hampton Union - Monitor Confederacy - Merrimack Civil War Battles Appomattox Civil War ended at Appomattox Court House Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered his army to Union General Ulysses S. Grant in April of 1865. Important People Ulysses S. Grant Thomas Stonewall Jackson Robert E. Lee Jefferson Davis Nat Turner John Brown Harriet Tubman John Wilkes Booth Abraham Lincoln th President of the United States Abolished slavery in the United States with the 13 th Amendment to the Constitution Roles Most white Virginians supported the Confederacy The Confederacy relied on enslaved African Americans to raise crops and provide labor for the army Many enslaved African Americans fled to the Union army as it approached and some fought for the Union Roles Some free African Americans felt their limited rights could best be protected by supporting the Confederacy Most American Indians did not take sides during the Civil War Roles White Virginians Enslaved African Americans Free African Americans American Indians Most supported the Confederacy The Confederacy relied on enslaved African Americans to raise crops and provide labor for the army. Many fled to the Union and some fought for the Union. Some felt their limited rights could be best protected by supporting the Confederacy Most did not take sides during the Civil War.
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