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O-HELP USER MANUAL Release v 2.0 October 1, 2015 Development Team: Daniel T. Gillins, Michael J. Olsen, Mahyar Sharifi-Mood, Farid Javadnejad, Rubini Narayanan School of Civil and Construction Engineering
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O-HELP USER MANUAL Release v 2.0 October 1, 2015 Development Team: Daniel T. Gillins, Michael J. Olsen, Mahyar Sharifi-Mood, Farid Javadnejad, Rubini Narayanan School of Civil and Construction Engineering College of Engineering, Oregon State University Introduction:... 4 Background:... 4 Intended Audience:... 4 Participants in the Project:... 4 Disclaimer:... 5 Data Sources... 5 Layer Control Option... 5 General Site Info Tab... 5 Digital Elevation Model... 6 Geology... 6 Site Class... 6 SLIDO Database - Version CSZ Hazards Tab... 7 Earthquake Scenario Slider... 7 Ground Motion... 7 Seismically induced Landslides... 9 Liquefaction... 9 Fault Rupture... 9 Tsunami Probabilistic Hazards Tab Tool Features Overview Map Zooming and Panning User Help Address Locator Base Layer Selection Transparency Tool P a g e 7. Reports Tool Single Point Report MultiPoint Report CSV MultiPoint Report Print Map Measure Tool Line Segment Polygon Clear button Eraser Tool Scalebar Future work References: Appendix: Access to the data: Troubleshooting and FAQs: P a g e INTRODUCTION: This is a user manual for the O-HELP (Oregon Hazard Explorer for Lifelines Program) website, which is a user-friendly, web-based geographic information system (GIS) tool to assess potential earthquake hazards in Oregon, developed with support from the Cascadia Lifelines Program (CLiP). The website contains previously mapped hazard information on severe ground shaking, landslides, liquefaction and lateral spreading, co-seismic subsidence, and potential tsunami inundation lines in a simple and powerful web-based interface which does not require the user to have extensive knowledge of GIS. BACKGROUND: Unfortunately, the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) is capable of generating a M9.0 earthquake that could greatly damage the built environment in Oregon. Such a powerful and long-lasting earthquake can generate severe ground shaking, landslides, liquefaction-induced ground deformations, fault rupture vertical displacement, tsunamis, etc. These seismic deformations will likely be considerably damaging to foundations, bridges, roadways, pipelines, and other lifelines. Many of Oregon s lifeline providers, such as public and private entities responsible for transportation, electric and gas utilities, water and wastewater, fuel, airports, and harbors face an aging infrastructure that was built prior to a full understanding of this extreme seismic risk. Generally, available methods to assess and mitigate seismic risk to these vital lifelines have been developed for much shorter duration, crustal earthquakes, typical of those experienced in California. However, such methods may not be appropriate for mitigating subduction zone earthquakes which can last up to three- to five-minutes, as recently experienced in Chile and Japan, and expected in Oregon. As such, The purpose of the O-HELP website is to provide easy access to the latest and best available hazard information over the web, including work completed in the recent Oregon Resilience Plan (ORP) (OSSPAC, 2013) and other work completed by the Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). INTENDED AUDIENCE: This tool is designed for engineers, planners, geologists, and others who need this information to help make appropriate decisions. It is assumed that the users have enough knowledge about earthquake engineering and geologic hazards to understand what the data means and how to use it appropriately. Minimal knowledge of GIS will be needed to work with this web-gis tool. Participants in the Project: Participating organizations in CLiP include: the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), Portland General Electric (PGE), Northwest Natural Gas (NWN), Portland Water Bureau (PWB), Port of Portland (PDX), Eugene Water and Electric Board (EWEB), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Tualatin Valley Water District (TVWD). The Department of Oregon Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) developed several of the datasets that have been included in the website. They have also contributed ideas to the design of the website. The following people have contributed to the development and maintenance of the website: Daniel T. Gillins (PI), Michael J. Olsen (Co-PI), Rubini Narayanan, and Mahyar Sharifi-Mood. All of these individuals are part of the Geomatics research group in the School of Civil and Construction Engineering at Oregon State University. 4 P a g e DISCLAIMER: The Geomatics research group in School of Civil and Construction Engineering at the Oregon State University works to ensure that the information provided on this website is accurate, timely, and useful. The information provided herein is for reference only and is not suitable for incorporation in engineering design or site-specific analysis; instead, it provides a starting point to identify and understand hazards of primary concern. For more generalized information regarding earthquake and other types of hazards in Oregon meant for the general public, please visit the web page of Oregon HazVu: Statewide Geohazards Viewer at: The Geomatics research group is not responsible for errors or omissions in information provided on this website. Any use of this website or the information available at this website is at your own risk and we will not be responsible for the consequences of your decision to utilize the information. Visitors are encouraged to confirm the information contained on this website with other reliable sources and agencies. Use and access to this website or any of the links contained within this website do not create an engineering consultant-client relationship. The linked websites are not under Geomatics research group s control and the research group does not assume any responsibility or liability for any communication or materials available at such linked websites. Corrections and additions to this website will be made when necessary or as time permits. DATA SOURCES The web-gis framework for O-HELP has been designed in ESRI s ArcGIS for Server (i.e., ArcServer) platform. ArcServer enables the use of several of ESRI s base layers, including aerial imagery, topographic maps, and road networks. The tectonic activities of the Cascadia Subduction Zone are capable of triggering great seismic events, hence numerous layers of raster and vector data depicting such hazards associated with a M8.1, M8.4, M8.7, and M9.0 Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) earthquake have been collected and uploaded to this platform. Many of these data layers were published in the Oregon Resilience Plan (OSSPAC, 2013; Madin and Burns, 2013). LAYER CONTROL OPTION Three icons which control the various data layers are presented in the upper right portion of the O-HELP website. Each selectable icon is discussed below. General Site Info Tab Selecting this icon creates a box of headers that allow the user to access several data layers of general site information. The headers are: Elevation Model, Geology, NEHRP site class, and data streamed from the SLIDO database (version 3.2). Selecting a header will then allow the user to select and view various data layers, as defined below, by clicking on a radio button. 5 P a g e Digital Elevation Model 30 meter resolution: a raster hybrid digital elevation model (DEM) which combines 1 meter LIDAR data from the Oregon LIDAR Consortium where available with 10 meter resolution USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) data elsewhere. The data were then resampled using bilinear interpolation to a 30 m cell size to balance file size with level of detail. The NED data was obtained from at the USGS at More information about the LIDAR data can be found at: Geology Site Geology: a vector polygon feature layer depicting general site geology in Oregon, compiled by DOGAMI and made available through the Oregon Geologic Data Compilation (OGDC) v5.0. This file was downloaded at on March 22, Fault: a vector polyline feature layer depicting mapped quaternary (i.e. active) faults of the last 1,600,000 years (USGS, 2006). This file was downloaded from the USGS at on March 4, Site Class NEHRP: a vector polygon feature depicting soil site class, as defined by the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP). These data were produced by DOGAMI and published as part of the Oregon Resilience Plan (OSSPAC, 2013). Table 1 gives the profile type for each soil site class according to the average shear wave velocity in the upper 30 meters of the site profile. Table 1- NEHRP Site classification definitions (BSSC, 2001). Site Class Profile Type Rock/Soil Shear wave Velocity (m/s) A Hard rock 1500 B Rock C Very dense soil/soft rock D Stiff soil E Soft soil 180 F Special soils requiring sitespecific evaluation SLIDO Database - Version 3.2 DOGAMI provides the Statewide Landslide Information Database for Oregon (SLIDO), which contains a compilation of landslides that have been identified on published maps (Burns et al., 2011). O-HELP streams these data directly from the SLIDO database server (Version 3), accessed directly at Since these data are streamed from DOGAMI s server, updates to SLIDO will be automatically updated in O-HELP. 6 P a g e Landslide Polygons: a vector polygon feature representing the landslide deposits and scarps along with scarp flanks. Landslide Points: the location of historic landslides which occurred in Oregon, compiled as a point feature dataset. CSZ Hazards Tab Selecting this icon creates a box of headers that allow the user to access several hazard layers associated with scenarios M9.0, M8.7, M8.4, and M8.1 CSZ earthquake. The headers area: Ground Motion, Landslide, Liquefaction, Fault Rupture, and Tsunami. Selecting a header will then allow the user to select and view various data layers, as defined below, by clicking on a radio button. Earthquake Scenario Slider User can select between four Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) earthquake scenarios of M8.1, M8.4, M8.7, and M9.0. The default values is magnitude 9.0 scenario, which changing the slider to any of the earthquake magnitude scenarios will make earthquake hazard map of that scenario available for user in the data layers of CSZ hazard tab. Ground Motion Modified Mercalli scale: a raster showing the intensity of the earthquake at the surface according to the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale. The raster was computed using mapped PGA values from the Oregon Resilience Plan (OSSPAC, 2013; Madin and Burns, 2013), and a regression relationship developed in Wald et al. (1999). The Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale refers to the expected effects experienced at a place during the earthquake. Lower numbers of the scale generally deal with how the earthquake is felt by people; higher numbers are based on observations of structural damage (see Table 2). Peak ground acceleration (PGA): a raster of PGA values at the ground surface during any of the CSZ earthquake scenarios. This raster was published in the Oregon Resilience Plan (OSSPAC, 2013). DOGAMI described the method and data used to develop this raster in Madin and Burns (2013). Briefly, the raster was computed using bedrock PGA values from a USGS Shakemap for a scenario M9.0 CSZ earthquake, a polygon feature of NEHRP site classes described above, and soil amplification relationships in Boore and Atkinson (2008). The Shakemap is available at: Peak ground Velocity: a raster of PGV values at the ground surface during the CSZ earthquake scenarios. This raster was published in the Oregon Resilience Plan (OSSPAC, 2013). DOGAMI described the method and data used to develop this raster in Madin and Burns (2013). Briefly, the raster was computed using bedrock one-second spectral acceleration (SA01) values from the same USGS Shakemap as the one used for computing the PGA raster. Then, based on the 7 P a g e polygon feature of NEHRP site classes described above, SA01 values at the ground surface were computed using soil amplification relationships in Boore and Atkinson (2008). Finally, the SA01 values were converted into PGV values by using the relationship described in Newmark and Hall (1982). Short period spectral response: This layer provide raster of surficial 0.3-second spectral acceleration values for the selected CSZ earthquake scenario from the scenario slider. Table 2- Abbreviated description of the 12 levels of Modified Mercalli Intensity (from accessed July 2014). No. I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X XI XII Description Not felt except by a very few under especially favorable conditions. Felt only by a few persons at rest, especially on upper floors of buildings. Felt quite noticeably by persons indoors, especially on upper floors of buildings. Many people do not recognize it as an earthquake. Standing motor cars may rock slightly. Vibrations similar to the passing of a truck. Duration estimated. Felt indoors by many, outdoors by few during the day. At night, some awakened. Dishes, windows, doors disturbed; walls make cracking sound. Sensation like heavy truck striking building. Standing motor cars rocked noticeably. Felt by nearly everyone; many awakened. Some dishes, windows broken. Unstable objects overturned. Pendulum clocks may stop. Felt by all, many frightened. Some heavy furniture moved; a few instances of fallen plaster. Damage slight. Damage negligible in buildings of good design and construction; slight to moderate in well-built ordinary structures; considerable damage in poorly built or badly designed structures; some chimneys broken. Damage slight in specially designed structures; considerable damage in ordinary substantial buildings with partial collapse. Damage great in poorly built structures. Fall of chimneys, factory stacks, columns, monuments, walls. Heavy furniture overturned. Damage considerable in specially designed structures; well-designed frame structures thrown out of plumb. Damage great in substantial buildings, with partial collapse. Buildings shifted off foundations. Some well-built wooden structures destroyed; most masonry and frame structures destroyed with foundations. Rails bent. Few, if any (masonry) structures remain standing. Bridges destroyed. Rails bent greatly. Damage total. Lines of sight and level are distorted. Objects thrown into the air. One second spectral response: a raster of one-second spectral acceleration values at the ground surface during the CSZ earthquake scenarios. This raster was published in the Oregon Resilience Plan (OSSPAC, 2013). DOGAMI described the method and data used to develop this raster in Madin and Burns (2013). Briefly, this raster was computed using bedrock one-second spectral acceleration (SA01) values from the same USGS Shakemap as the one used for computing the PGA raster depicted in O-HELP. Then, based on the polygon feature of NEHRP site classes 8 P a g e described above, SA01 values at the ground surface were computed using soil amplification relationships in Boore and Atkinson (2008). Seismically induced Landslides Landslide triggering probability: a raster depicting landslide triggering probabilities given a CSZ earthquake scenario of M8.1, M8.4, M8.7 and M9.0. This raster was published in the Oregon Resilience Plan (OSSPAC, 2013). DOGAMI described the method and data used to develop this raster in Madin and Burns (2013). Briefly, the raster was computed using the model described in section of HAZUS-MH MR4 software (FEMA, 2011). DOGAMI input a new landslide susceptibility map and the PGA raster depicted in O-HELP in this model. Then, following HAZUS (FEMA, 2011) recommendations, the probabilities of landslide triggering were scaled to a maximum of 30%. Landslide displacement: a raster depicting landslide displacement given a CSZ earthquake scenario of M8.1, M8.4, M8.7 and M9.0. This raster was published in the Oregon Resilience Plan (OSSPAC, 2013). DOGAMI described the method and data used to develop this raster in Madin and Burns (2013). Briefly, the raster was computed using the model described in section of HAZUS-MH MR4 software (FEMA, 2011). DOGAMI input a new landslide susceptibility map and the PGA raster depicted in O-HELP in this model. Then, following HAZUS (FEMA, 2011) equation 4-25, the permanent ground displacement of peak ground displacement was computed. Liquefaction Liquefaction triggering probability: a raster depicting liquefaction triggering probabilities given a CSZ earthquake scenario of M8.1, M8.4, M8.7 and M9.0. This raster was published in the Oregon Resilience Plan (OSSPAC, 2013). DOGAMI described the method and data used to develop this raster in Madin and Burns (2013). Briefly, the raster was computed using the model described in section of HAZUS-MH MR4 software (FEMA, 2011). DOGAMI input a new liquefaction susceptibility map and the PGA raster depicted in O-HELP in this model. Then, following HAZUS (FEMA, 2011) recommendations, the probabilities of liquefaction triggering were scaled to a maximum of 30%. Lateral spreading: a raster depicting lateral spreading given a CSZ earthquake scenario of M8.1, M8.4, M8.7 and M9.0. This raster was published in the Oregon Resilience Plan (OSSPAC, 2013). DOGAMI described the method and data used to develop this raster in Madin and Burns (2013). Briefly, the raster was computed using the model described in section of HAZUS-MH MR4 software (FEMA, 2011). DOGAMI input a new liquefaction susceptibility map and the PGA raster depicted in O-HELP in this model. Then, following HAZUS (FEMA, 2011) equation 4-23, the liquefaction-induced lateral spreading was computed. Fault Rupture Coastal co-seismic subsidence: This layer is only available for M9.0 CSZ earthquake. The layer is a raster depicting subsidence given a M9.0 CSZ earthquake. This is a parameter which depicts the land level change in a Cascadia subduction earthquake event along the coast. DOGAMI input the elastic dislocation models by Witter et al (2011) in order to compute this map. 9 P a g e Tsunami Anticipated inundation area: This layer is only available for M9.0 CSZ earthquake. The dataset is shapefile representing the areas which will be inundated in a Large (L1) tsunami scenario for Oregon coast. The methods and data used to make this map are described in detail in Priest et al (2013). Probabilistic Hazards Tab This button is under development button and will eventually provide a collapsible set of layers corresponding to a probabilistic version of hazards rather than a scenario based maps. TOOL FEATURES Several features and tools in O-HELP (numbered in Figure 1) are defined individually below. Figure 1. Outline view of the O-HELP website with various feature tools and their screen location. 10 P a g e 1. Overview Map Located in the lower right corner of the website, an overview map shows the user where the main display is concentrated. As shown in Figure 2, the user can click and move the red box (1A) inside the overview map to change the current view extent. By clicking the small arrow in lower right corner (1B), the user can hide the overview map from displaying on the web page, if desired. Figure 2. The overview map, which is located at the bottom right corner of the website. 2. Zooming and Panning To navigate the map, the user can pan with a mouse. They can also zoom in and out with the or by using the mouse wheel. The initial default view is the entire State of Oregon. buttons 3. User Help Clicking on this icon provides a link to the OHELP user manual document. 4. Address Locator This tool enables the user to search for a specific location by entering either geographic coordinates in longitude, latitude format, or by entering the address for a location of interest. Once the user inputs the search information, the locator will show the place by dropping a black pin on the map. A window will then pop up in the map with the latitude and longitude information for that site (see Figure 3). Within the same pop-up window, there is a link that can be selected for generating a report for that location.
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