Announcing AP U.S. History Course and Exam Revisions

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Announcing AP U.S. History Course and Exam Revisions AP Annual Conference July 20, 2012 * Atlanta Focus Group participants estimated that they spend approximately 140 ...
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Title: Announcing AP U.S. History Course and Exam Revisions 1 Announcing AP U.S. History Course and Exam Revisions
  • AP Annual Conference
  • July 20, 2012 2 AP USH Course and Exam Revisions
  • Agenda
  • Course Update
  • Project Goals
  • The AP U.S. History Curriculum Framework
  • The Revised AP U.S. History Exam Design
  • Teacher Support
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Audience Q A
  • 3 AP U.S. History Course Update
  • Announced in email to AP U.S. History teachers, June 2012
  • The AP U.S. History Curriculum Framework will be available in October 2012 The course will first be taught in fall 2014, with the first revised AP Exam given in May 2015. Workshop consultant training will begin in spring 2013 and continue in spring 2014. Teacher support efforts will roll out over the next 2 years. 4 AP U.S. History Revision Goals 5 Revision Goals Depth and Breadth
  • What are some benefits of going into depth when studying the past?
  • 6 Revision Goals Depth and Breadth
  • What are the benefits of going into depth when studying the past?
  • Patterns Use specifics to understand larger trends
  • Inquiry Ask questions instead of memorizing answers
  • Critical Thinking Develop the ability to reason with evidence
  • Engagement Build off of curiosity and connection
  • but going into depth takes instructional time. 7 Revision Goals AP Teachers
  • AP Teacher Survey, Open Forum, 2011 AP U.S. History Reading
  • The current AP U.S. History Exam effectively provides teachers with flexibility to teach some topics in greater depth than others.
  • Strongly Agree
  • Agree
  • Neutral
  • Disagree
  • Strongly Disagree
  • 8 Revision Goals AP Teachers
  • AP Teacher Survey, Open Forum, 2011 AP U.S. History Reading
  • The current AP U.S. History Exam effectively provides teachers with flexibility to teach some topics in greater depth than others. Strongly Agree, Agree Neutral Disagree, Strongly Disagree 9 Revision Goals Higher Ed
  • 1. Develop Student Proficiency In Historical Thinking Skills
  • I think skills are vastly more crucial to success than content knowledge I really think the increased focus on the 4 basic skills as an organizational framework is very important. Really stress to teachers to focus on the skills, as that is the most important part of the course in my mind. Source Higher Education Validation Study, November 2010 10 Revision Goals Higher Ed
  • 2. Include Critical Recent Scholarship in U.S. History
  • 11 Revision Goals
  • AP teachers and higher ed faculty share the same goal
  • 12 The Draft Curriculum Framework
  • Validating the Scope Higher Ed
  • Overall results
  • Very effective at preparing students for success in sequent college-level U.S. history courses
  • Highly favorable for granting credit and placement
  • Appropriately balances depth of conceptual understanding with breadth of topic coverage to foster student success in subsequent college-level courses
  • 13 The Draft Curriculum Framework
  • Validating the Scope Higher Ed
  • The study also confirmed that Higher Ed faculty would be less likely to grant AP credit and placement to a course that did not include pre-Columbian and recent history. Mean Scores of Essential Knowledge Statements, by Period 7.36 Mean of Essential Knowledge Statements for whole curriculum framework document Period 1 (1491-1607) Mean 7.14 Period 9 (1980-present) Mean 7.19 14 The Draft Curriculum Framework
  • Validating the Scope AP Teachers
  • AP Teachers working in focus groups estimated that the revised course could fit comfortably within the academic year
  • Without seeing a revised exam, however, participants estimates were highly tentative
  • 15 At this time last year, we asked
  • Cut additional topics from the curriculum framework?
  • Reduce or even get rid of the multiple choice section?
  • Have students submit a portfolio based assessment?
  • Turn the course into two courses (U.S. History 1 and 2)?
  • How should AP U.S. History change to promote the goals of flexibility and depth? Should the College Board 16 Research into Options
  • Recommendations on Next Steps
  • High School and Higher Ed Partners
  • Not enthusiastic about splitting the course or removing more topics from the curriculum.
  • Focus AP Exam questions on historical reasoning
  • Reward classroom flexibility with the types of questions asked
  • Retain multiple-choice questions, but rethink their purpose
  • Experts on Historical Thinking and Learning 17 A Comprehensive Solution Assessment Curriculum Clearly identify whats being assessed in the curriculum framework Rethink the AP Exam design to match curricular expectations 18 The AP U.S. History Curriculum Framework 19 The AP USH Curriculum Framework
  • Major elements
  • Nine historical thinking skills
  • Seven course themes
  • Key concepts for each of nine periods
  • Learning Objectives for the course as a whole
  • 20 Defining the Historical Thinking Skills
  • Proficiencies defined across the three AP History courses
  • 21 Defining Course Themes
  • Overarching big ideas that structure the course as a whole
  • 22 Defining the Course Periods 23 Defining Key Concepts within Periods
  • Period 5, Key Concept 5.1 The United States became more connected with the world as it pursued an expansionist foreign policy in the Western Hemisphere and emerged as the destination for many migrants from other countries.
  • I. Enthusiasm for U.S. territorial expansion, fueled by economic and national security interests and supported by claims of U.S. racial and cultural superiority, resulted in war, the opening of new markets, acquisition of new territory, and increased ideological conflicts. (ID-2) (WXT-2) (WOR-6) (ENV-3)
  • A. The idea of Manifest Destiny, which asserted U.S. power in the Western Hemisphere and supported U.S. expansion westward, was built on a belief in white racial superiority and a sense of American cultural superiority, and helped to shape the eras political debates.
  • 24 Defining Key Concepts within Periods
  • Period 5, Key Concept 5.1 The United States became more connected with the world as it pursued an expansionist foreign policy in the Western Hemisphere and emerged as the destination for many migrants from other countries.
  • I. Enthusiasm for U.S. territorial expansion, fueled by economic and national security interests and supported by claims of U.S. racial and cultural superiority, resulted in war, the opening of new markets, acquisition of new territory, and increased ideological conflicts. (ID-2) (WXT-2) (WOR-6) (ENV-3)
  • D. U.S. interest in expanding trade led to economic, diplomatic, and cultural initiatives westward to Asia.
  • AP Exam questions will not ask students about the topics in the gray boxes 25 Focusing on Key Developments
  • Emphasizing overarching patterns allows teachers to explore specific topics in depth with their students
  • 2.1.III In teaching about British colonial development, teachers can choose to illustrate each region by focusing in depth on one colony from 3 regions, not the specifics of all 13 colonies
  • 4.1.II Teachers can illustrate the growth of democratic and social idealism by focusing in depth on one or more antebellum reform movements, not every group, individual, or movement (Charles Finney, Brook Farm, Oneida Community, temperance movements)
  • 7.1.II Teachers can focus in depth on one or more pieces of federal legislation illustrating the Progressive desire to regulate corporate abuses and the economy, not all acts and agencies (e.g. Elkins Act, Pure Food and Drug Act, Federal Reserve Act)
  • 26 Defining Course Learning Objectives An overarching big idea for the course as a whole Theme Key Concept Specific events in U.S. history where we can study this theme in context Key Concept Key Concept Key Concept Ways that historians investigate and reason about this phenomenon Skill Statement about what students should know and be able to do to succeed on the AP Exam Learning Objective 27 Defining Course Learning Objectives Theme Identity e.g., Period 5, Key Concept 5.1.I Enthusiasm for U.S. territorial expansion, fueled by economic and national security interests and supported by claims of U.S. racial and cultural superiority, resulted in war, the opening of new markets, acquisition of new territory, and increased ideological conflicts. Key Concept Key Concept Key Concept Key Concept All AP Exam questions will now be based on these Learning Objectives. Skill Change and Continuity over Time Students demonstrate understanding of ways that debates over national identity have changed over time. In particular, students can Learning Objective 28 Defining Course Learning Objectives
  • Theme Identity First 3 Learning Objectives
  • 29 Connections to Each Period
  • Learning Objectives connect key concepts thematically across the different time periods of the course
  • Period 5, Key Concept 5.1 The United States became more connected with the world as it pursued an expansionist foreign policy in the Western Hemisphere and emerged as the destination for many migrants from other countries.
  • I. Enthusiasm for U.S. territorial expansion, fueled by economic and national security interests and supported by claims of U.S. racial and cultural superiority, resulted in war, the opening of new markets, acquisition of new territory, and increased ideological conflicts.
  • A. The idea of Manifest Destiny, which asserted U.S. power in the Western Hemisphere and supported U.S. expansion westward, was built on a belief in white racial superiority and a sense of American cultural superiority, and helped to shape the eras political debates.
  • (ID-2) (WXT-2) (WOR-6) (ENV-3) 30 The AP USH Curriculum Framework 31 The Revised AP U.S. History Exam Design 32 Assessing the Learning Objectives
  • In order to assess student understanding of the learning objectives, exam questions should
  • Be designed to elicit student reasoning with the different historical thinking skills
  • Focus on student understanding of long-term, significant historical developments
  • Allow students flexibility in drawing on different historical examples to answer questions
  • 33 AP History Exam Design
  • Type, time and percentage of total AP Exam score
  • Multiple choice 35 minutes 30(36 questions, organized in sets of 2-6)
  • Short-answer question 50 minutes 25(4 short answer questions)
  • Document-based question 60 minutes 25
  • Long-essay question 35 minutes 20
  • Each set is focused on one or more learning objectives
  • Each set is organized around the primary and secondary sources of U.S. history
  • 34 Rethinking Multiple Choice Questions
  • The MCQ section will have approximately 36 questions total, accounting for 30 of the exam score and 35 minutes of exam time
  • Multiple-choice questions will appear in sets of 2-6 and ask students to analyze historical texts, interpretations, and evidence
  • Stimulus material will reflect the overarching course learning objectives
  • All different types of sources will be covered primary and secondary sources, images, graphs, maps
  • No questions will solely reward reading comprehension
  • 35 Draft MCQ Set Stimulus
  • Learning Objective ID-2
  • Students can assess the impact of Manifest Destiny, territorial expansion, the Civil War, and industrialization on popular beliefs about progress and the national destiny of the United States in the 19th century
  • Key Concept 5.1.I.A
  • The idea of Manifest Destiny, which asserted U.S. power in the Western Hemisphere and supported U.S. expansion westward, was built on a belief in white racial superiority and a sense of American cultural superiority, and helped to shape the eras political debates.
  • 36 Draft MCQ Set Questions
  • The ideas expressed in the passage above most clearly show the influence of which of the following?
  • (A) Models of limited government inherent in the Articles of Confederation
  • (B) Beliefs in separation of powers articulated in the United States Constitution
  • (C) Concerns about foreign alliances expressed in George Washingtons Farewell Address
  • (D) Concepts of republican self-rule found in the Declaration of Independence
  • The process described in the passage above most directly led to political controversies in the 1840s and 1850s over the
  • (A) expansion of slavery into newly acquired territories
  • (B) authority of the Supreme Court to overturn federal laws
  • (C) role of the federal government in economic development
  • (D) use of natural resources in newly acquired territories
  • 37 Draft MCQ Set Questions
  • Which of the following events in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries represents a continuation of the process described in the passage above?
  • (A) Efforts to restrict immigration to the United States
  • (B) The Supreme Courts endorsement of racial segregation
  • (C) The United States gaining possession of overseas territories
  • (D) Political parties attempts to regulate economic activities
  • 38 Students Reasoning Historically Student Participants in Think Aloud Study, March 2012 39 Draft Question Short Answer
  • 4 questions per section 50 minutes total
  • Learning Objective ID-1
  • Students can analyze how competing conceptions of national identity were expressed in the development of political institutions and cultural values from the late colonial through the antebellum periods
  • Historical Thinking Skill
  • Periodization
  • 40 Draft Document-Based Question
  • 1 question 60 minutes
  • Learning Objective PEO-3
  • Analyze the causes and effects of major internal migration patterns such as urbanization, suburbanization, westward movement, and the Great Migration in the 19th and 20th centuries
  • Historical Thinking Skills
  • Continuity/Change over Time
  • Argumentation
  • Use of Evidence
  • Synthesis
  • 41 Draft Question Long Essay
  • Choice between 2 questions 35 minutes
  • Learning Objective ID-1
  • Students can analyze how competing conceptions of national identity were expressed in the development of political institutions and cultural values from the late colonial through the antebellum periods.
  • Historical Thinking Skill
  • Change and Continuity over Time
  • 42 Early Teacher Reactions Knowing that larger patterns, ideas, and themes will be tested helps me feel as though I have greater freedom to get into depth in areas of interest to the students and my personal expertiseI have always tried to do this in my current course, but now I will not feel the same rush to push through all of the content and in turn cut out some of those valuable skill development opportunities. 43 Early Teacher Reactions I'm very excited about the new course.  I think the new course is both doable and will require teachers to get through the 20th centuryI am also looking forward to the freedom (less prescription) that I am anticipating in the new test. 44 Early Teacher Reactions I love the Curriculum Framework.  I believe this will be especially helpful for teachers just getting involved in the subject and will probably be well used by the consultants that conduct the AP trainingsSo many districts are cash-strapped, many teachers are being given AP teaching assignments with no real assistance... to me this makes the framework even more critical. 45 Teacher Support 46 Anticipated Teacher Support 47 Anticipated Teacher Support 48 Frequently Asked Questions 49 Frequently Asked Questions
  • Will the College Board help prepare administrators, parents , and the public for the revised course and exam?
  • What are textbook publishers doing in response to these changes?
  • Will there be enough exam questions for us to use to prepare our students?
  • My state requires that I teach certain content in my US History course. How will the AP US History course revisions affect me?
  • How do the changes to the AP US History course and exam align with the move toward Common Core State Standards?
  • How will AP Workshop and Summer Institute consultants be trained on the revised course and exam?
  • 50 Audience Q A 51 Share Your Feedback On This Session
  • And Earn Continuing Education Units (CEUs)
  • Visit the conference website at apac.collegeboard.org
  • Click on Earn Main Conference CEUs
  • From there you will be taken to the CEU Online Platform
  • Questions?
  • While onsite, visit the information desk at the Convention Foyer, Dolp
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