Annotated work sample portfolios are provided to support implementation of the Foundation Year 10 Australian Curriculum.

Please download to get full document.

View again

of 11
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Information Report
Category:

Recipes/Menus

Published:

Views: 0 | Pages: 11

Extension: PDF | Download: 0

Share
Related documents
Description
Work sample portfolio summary WORK SAMPLE PORTFOLIO Annotated work sample portfolios are provided to support implementation of the Foundation Year 10 Australian Curriculum. Each portfolio is an example
Transcript
Work sample portfolio summary WORK SAMPLE PORTFOLIO Annotated work sample portfolios are provided to support implementation of the Foundation Year 10 Australian Curriculum. Each portfolio is an example of evidence of student learning in relation to the achievement standard. Three portfolios are available for each achievement standard, illustrating satisfactory, above satisfactory and below satisfactory student achievement. The set of portfolios assists teachers to make on-balance judgements about the quality of their students achievement. Each portfolio comprises a collection of students work drawn from a range of assessment tasks. There is no predetermined number of student work samples in a portfolio, nor are they sequenced in any particular order. Each work sample in the portfolio may vary in terms of how much student time was involved in undertaking the task or the degree of support provided by the teacher. The portfolios comprise authentic samples of student work and may contain errors such as spelling mistakes and other inaccuracies. Opinions expressed in student work are those of the student. The portfolios have been selected, annotated and reviewed by classroom teachers and other curriculum experts. The portfolios will be reviewed over time. ACARA acknowledges the contribution of Australian teachers in the development of these work sample portfolios. THIS PORTFOLIO: YEAR 8 HISTORY This portfolio provides the following student work samples: Sample 1 Sample 2 Sample 3 Sample 4 Explanation: Castles Comparison: Knights and samurai Source analysis: Bayeux tapestry Source analysis: What the Vikings were really like This portfolio of student work shows that the student can recognise and explain patterns of change and continuity over time in the design of castles (WS1). The student explains the causes and effects of events and developments (WS1). The student identifies the motives and actions of people at the time (WS1). The student explains the significance of individuals and groups, including knights and samurai, and how they were influenced by the beliefs and values of their society (WS2) and makes reference to an interpretation about the Vikings (WS4). The student analyses, selects and organises information from primary and secondary sources and uses it as evidence to answer inquiry questions about knights and samurai (WS2). When interpreting sources, the student identifies their origin and purpose, and distinguishes between fact and opinion (WS3, WS4). The student develops texts, particularly descriptions and explanations, incorporating analysis (WS1, WS2, WS3, WS4). In developing these texts, and organising and presenting findings, the student uses historical terms and concepts (WS1, WS3), evidence identified in sources, and acknowledges their sources of information (WS4). COPYRIGHT Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, you may view, download, display, print, reproduce (such as by making photocopies) and distribute these materials in unaltered form only for your personal, non-commercial educational purposes or for the non-commercial educational purposes of your organisation, provided that you retain this copyright notice. For the avoidance of doubt, this means that you cannot edit, modify or adapt any of these materials and you cannot sub-license any of these materials to others. Apart from any uses permitted under the Act 1968 (Cth), and those explicitly granted above, all other rights are reserved by ACARA. For further information, refer to (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/home/copyright). December Edition Page 1 of 11 Work sample 1 Explanation: Castles achievement standard The parts of the achievement standard targeted in the assessment task are highlighted. By the end of, students recognise and explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They explain the causes and effects of events and developments. They identify the motives and actions of people at the time. Students explain the significance of individuals and groups and how they were influenced by the beliefs and values of their society. They describe different interpretations of the past. Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework with reference to periods of time. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They analyse, select and organise information from primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students identify and explain different points of view in sources. When interpreting sources, they identify their origin and purpose, and distinguish between fact and opinion. Students develop texts, particularly descriptions and explanations, incorporating analysis. In developing these texts, and organising and presenting their findings, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and acknowledge their sources of information. Summary of task Students discussed the reasons for the changes that occurred in medieval Europe, with a focus on the development of castles, the impact of the Crusades and the weakening of the feudal system. The students were asked to write a formal extended response on one of the following questions: Explain the changes in castles in the medieval period. Explain the changes that occurred in medieval Europe as a result of the Crusades. Explain the factors that weakened the feudal system. Students spent one week researching and planning their response and they completed this task in class in a 60-minute lesson. December Edition Page 2 of 11 Work sample 1 Explanation: Castles Identifies a motive for the building of motte and bailey castles. Describes the features of a motte and bailey castle. Gives a reason why stone keeps replaced motte and bailey castles. Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, a more restrictive licence applies. For more information, please see the first page of this set of work samples and the copyright notice on the Australian Curriculum website (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/home/copyright) Edition Page 3 of 11 Work sample 1 Explanation: Castles Recognises change over time in the types of castles constructed. Describes the features of stone keeps. (Overview) The student describes the features of two types of castles and uses historical terms and concepts, for example, motte and bailey castle and stone keep. Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, a more restrictive licence applies. For more information, please see the first page of this set of work samples and the copyright notice on the Australian Curriculum website (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/home/copyright) Edition Page 4 of 11 Work sample 2 Comparison: Knights and samurai achievement standard The parts of the achievement standard targeted in the assessment task are highlighted. By the end of, students recognise and explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They explain the causes and effects of events and developments. They identify the motives and actions of people at the time. Students explain the significance of individuals and groups and how they were influenced by the beliefs and values of their society. They describe different interpretations of the past. Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework with reference to periods of time. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They analyse, select and organise information from primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students identify and explain different points of view in sources. When interpreting sources, they identify their origin and purpose, and distinguish between fact and opinion. Students develop texts, particularly descriptions and explanations, incorporating analysis. In developing these texts, and organising and presenting their findings, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and acknowledge their sources of information. Summary of task Students investigated the life and roles of both medieval European knights and Japanese samurai in their societies, using a range of primary and secondary sources. They used retrieval charts to record information about the following aspects: training, clothing, weaponry, code of conduct, role in society, and other interesting facts for knights and samurai. The students were then required to: create a Venn diagram to compare and contrast knights and samurai present a case for who would be the greatest hero: samurai or knight. Students spent one week researching and planning their response and they completed this task in class in a 60-minute lesson. December Edition Page 5 of 11 Work sample 2 Comparison: Knights and samurai Uses a Venn diagram to record some similarities between knights and samurai. Uses an historical term, that is lords. Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, a more restrictive licence applies. For more information, please see the first page of this set of work samples and the copyright notice on the Australian Curriculum website (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/home/ copyright) Edition Page 6 of 11 Work sample 2 Comparison: Knights and samurai Gives some reasons for the view that the samurai were more powerful than the knights. (Overview) The student lists some comparisons between knights and samurai. Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, a more restrictive licence applies. For more information, please see the first page of this set of work samples and the copyright notice on the Australian Curriculum website (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/home/copyright) Edition Page 7 of 11 Work sample 3 Source analysis: Bayeux tapestry achievement standard The parts of the achievement standard targeted in the assessment task are highlighted. By the end of, students recognise and explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They explain the causes and effects of events and developments. They identify the motives and actions of people at the time. Students explain the significance of individuals and groups and how they were influenced by the beliefs and values of their society. They describe different interpretations of the past. Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework with reference to periods of time. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They analyse, select and organise information from primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students identify and explain different points of view in sources. When interpreting sources, they identify their origin and purpose, and distinguish between fact and opinion. Students develop texts, particularly descriptions and explanations, incorporating analysis. In developing these texts, and organising and presenting their findings, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and acknowledge their sources of information. Summary of task In class, students investigated change and continuity in medieval Europe, including the significance of the Battle of Hastings. They were required to examine a section of the Bayeux tapestry and explain why it was made and how useful it would be to historians as a source for the history of the period. Students were allocated 20 minutes in class to complete this task. December Edition Page 8 of 11 Work sample 3 Source analysis: Bayeux tapestry Indicates why the Bayeux tapestry was made, that is, to remember the battle. Provides a simple explanation of how the Bayeux tapestry is useful to historians. Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, a more restrictive licence applies. For more information, please see the first page of this set of work samples and the copyright notice on the Australian Curriculum website (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/home/copyright) Edition Page 9 of 11 Work sample 4 Source analysis: What the Vikings were really like achievement standard The parts of the achievement standard targeted in the assessment task are highlighted. By the end of, students recognise and explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They explain the causes and effects of events and developments. They identify the motives and actions of people at the time. Students explain the significance of individuals and groups and how they were influenced by the beliefs and values of their society. They describe different interpretations of the past. Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework with reference to periods of time. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They analyse, select and organise information from primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students identify and explain different points of view in sources. When interpreting sources, they identify their origin and purpose, and distinguish between fact and opinion. Students develop texts, particularly descriptions and explanations, incorporating analysis. In developing these texts, and organising and presenting their findings, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and acknowledge their sources of information. Summary of task Students learnt about the way of life of the Vikings and their travels and territorial expansion. The students were required to research different interpretations of the Vikings and to use sources to present their own view of the Vikings, as a written response one page in length. Students completed this task in class over three one-hour lessons. December Edition Page 10 of 11 Work sample 4 Source analysis: What the Vikings were really like Historical Interpretations: The Vikings Reputation of the Vikings Many people think that the Vikings were a nation. They were not a nation. Many people also believe that Vikings used to wear helmets with horns on them but the only helmet they wore didn t have horns of them. People think that Vikings favoured weapon was a double axe when in fact, it was not. They only used axes in battle. They also used other types of weapons in battle. Most people believe that the Vikings were cruel and bloodthirsty but the Vikings were only violent sometimes. They also thought that the Vikings did nothing but fight and kill people, but that is not the case. The Vikings peacefully colonised other places. Makes a distinction between an opinion about the Vikings and a fact about the Vikings. Identifies an interpretation of the Vikings, that they were only violent sometimes. Provides a reason in support of the interpretation, that the Vikings peacefully colonised other places. Some people also think that Vikings were cannibals! Questions 1) Did you kill dragons? 2) Did you use the horns on your helmets as weapons? 3) Do you go around Europe killing everyone? 4) What countries have you brutally taken over? 5) Do you only bathe once a week? 6) Do you use human skulls as cups? 7) Is the double axe everyone s favourite weapon? 8) How many people are in your nation? 9) Were you wild and bloodthirsty? 10) Were you cannibals? Develops a series of questions, some of which provide an opportunity for analysing primary sources for the Vikings. Bibliography: Historical Interpretation: The Vikings Acknowledges one source of information. Student work samples are not licensed under the creative commons license used for other material on the Australian Curriculum website. Instead, a more restrictive licence applies. For more information, please see the first page of this set of work samples and the copyright notice on the Australian Curriculum website (http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/home/copyright) Edition Page 11 of 11
Recommended
View more...
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks
SAVE OUR EARTH

We need your sign to support Project to invent "SMART AND CONTROLLABLE REFLECTIVE BALLOONS" to cover the Sun and Save Our Earth.

More details...

Sign Now!

We are very appreciated for your Prompt Action!

x