An Outline of Classical Rhetoric

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An Outline of Classical Rhetoric Frank D Angelo Adapted from English 523 Classical Rhetoric and Written Composition Arizona State University Rhetoric: The Three ...
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Title: An Outline of Classical Rhetoric 1 An Outline of Classical Rhetoric
  • Frank DAngelo
  • Adapted from
  • English 523 Classical Rhetoric and Written Composition
  • Arizona State University
  • 2 Rhetoric The Three Branches
  • 1.      Deliberative (political)
  • 2.      Judicial (forensic or legal)
  • 3.      Epideictic (Ceremonial)
  • 3 Deliberative (political)
  • Aimto exhort or dissuade
  • Endsexpediency or inexpediency
  • Timefuture
  • Audiencechooses between alternative courses of civic action.
  • 4 Judicial (forensic or legal)
  • Aimto accuse or defend
  • Endsjustice and injustice
  • Timepast
  • Audiencejudges the innocence or guilt of someone accused of a crime.
  • 5 Epideictic (ceremonial)
  • Aimto praise or blame
  • Endshonor and dishonor
  • Timepresent
  • Audience praises the speech and the skill of the orator.
  • 6 RhetoricThe Five Parts
  • Invention
  • Arrangement
  • Style
  • Memory
  • Delivery
  • 7 Invention
  • Stasisthe main points at issue
  • 8 Invention
  • Prooftwo kinds
  • Inartistic
  • Artistic
  • 9 Invention
  • Proof
  • a. Inartistic
  • 1) sworn testimony
  • 2) documents
  • 3) laws
  • 4) torture
  • 10 Invention
  • b. artistic
  • 1) ethicalspeakers character ethos
  • 2) emotionalaudiences mood pathos
  • 3) logicalrational argument logos
  • i) deductivetopoi and enthymemes
  • ii) inductiveexample
  • 11 Arrangement
  • Aristotle4 essential parts
  • proem
  • statement of facts
  • proof
  • epilogue
  • 12 Arrangement
  • Cicero7 part structure
  • exhortation
  • narration
  • proposition
  • confirmation
  • refutation
  • digression
  • conclusion
  • 13 Style The 3 Types
  • Low or plain (unornamented)
  • Middle (somewhere in between)
  • Grand (ornamented)
  • 14 Style the 4 Virtues
  • Purity (correctness)
  • Clarity
  • Decorum (appropriateness)
  • Ornament
  • 15 Style Sources of Ornament
  • Schemes
  • Tropes
  • 16 StasisDefinition of Stasis
  • 1. The first conflict of two sides of a case, resulting from the rejection of an accusation You did it, / I did not do it.
  • 2. The starting point of a case.
  • 3. The circumstances that give rise to a case.
  • 4. The point at issue in a legal argument.
  • 17 Stasis Four Kinds of Issues
  • Conjecturaldispute over a fact.
  • Definitionaldispute over a definition.
  • Qualitativedispute over the value, quality, or nature of an act.
  • Translativedispute over moving the issue from one court or jurisdiction to another.
  • 18 Stasis Central Question of the Case
  • Based on an analysis of the issues
  • Coming from the conflict of pleas I was justified in doing it. / You were not. Was he justified in doing it?
  • 19 StasisThe Reason or Excuse
  • That which holds the case together
  • He was justified in doing it because she killed my father.
  • 20 StasisPoint for Judges Decision
  • That which arises from denial of the reason or excuse.
  • That which arises from assertion of the reason or excuse.
  • 21 StasisFoundation of the Defense
  • Strongest argument.
  • Argument most relevant to the point for the judges decision.
  • 22 StasisAdvancing the Argument
  • Investigating the topoi.
  • Inductive and deductive reasoning.
  • 23 CLASSICAL INVENTIONCommon Topics of Invention
  • Process
  • Comparison
  • Contrast
  • Classification
  • Narration
  • Exemplification
  • Causes
  • Effects
  • Definition
  • Description
  • Negation
  • Analysis
  • 24 An Outline of Classical Rhetoric
  • Frank DAngelo
  • Adapted from
  • English 523 Classical Rhetoric and Written Composition
  • Arizona State University
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